The Nativity of Our Lord Jesus Christ

THE TWENTY-FIFTH DAY OF DECEMBER

In the 5199th year of the creation of the world,

from the time when God in the beginning created the heaven and the earth;

the 2957th year after the flood;

the 2015th year from the birth of Abraham;

the 1510th year from Moses, and the going forth of the people of Israel from Egypt;

the 1032nd year from the anointing of David King;

in the 65th week according to the prophecy of Daniel;

in the 194th Olympiad;

the 752nd year from the foundation of the City of Rome;

the 42nd year of the rule of Octavian Augustus, all the earth being at peace, Jesus Christ, the Eternal God, and the Son of the Eternal Father, desirous to sanctify the world by his most merciful coming, being conceived by the Holy Spirit, nine months after his conception was born in Bethlehem of Juda, made Man of the Virgin Mary.

THE NATIVITY OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST ACCORDING TO THE FLESH.

Arms of the Xunta de Galicia

Arms of Galicia.
Arms of Galicia.

The coat of arms of Galicia is described in the Spanish Law 5 of May 29, 1984, the Law of the symbols of Galicia.

The coat of arms of Galicia includes, enclosed in a field of azure, a chalice of gold with a silver host, accompanied by seven silver crosses, three on each side and one in the center of the shield (representative of the seven historic provinces of Galicia).

The royal crown in gules, enclosed in a golden ring set with precious stones, made up of eight acanthus leaf fleurons, out of which five are visible. Each leaf is set with pearls, and five tiaras are born from them to converge in a globe of azure, with the semi-meridian and the equator in gold, topped by a golden cross.

Glenfinnan Monument

The Glenfinnan Monument is situated at the head of Loch Shiel, erected in 1815 to mark the place where Prince Charles Edward Stuart ("Bonnie Prince Charlie") raised his standard, at the beginning of the 1745 Jacobite Rising.
The Glenfinnan Monument is situated at the head of Loch Shiel, erected in 1815 by Alexander Macdonald of Glenaladale, to mark the place where Prince Charles Edward Stuart (“Bonnie Prince Charlie”) raised his standard, at the beginning of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. The tower was designed by the Scottish architect James Gillespie Graham.

Awa’ Whigs Awa’

Our thrissles are a’ flourish’d
And bonnie bloom’d our roses
But Whigs cam like a frost in June
An’ wither’d a’ our posies

Chorus:
Awa’, Whigs, awa’
Awa’, Whigs, awa’
Ye’re jist a pack o’ traitor louns
Ye’ll dae nae guid at a’

Our sad decay in church and state
Surpasses my descriving
The Whigs cam o’er us like a curse
And we hae done wi’ thriving

Doon the law the Whigs’ll fa’
A’ sae tapsalteerie
And the craw, the raven and the rocks’ll fla’
Frae the wids around my dearie

Our ancient crown’s fa’n in the dust
Deil blin’ them wi’ the stoure o’t
An’ write their names in his black beuk
Wha gae the Whigs the power o’t

Grim vengeance lang has taen a nap
But we may see him wauken
Gude help the day when royal heads
Are hunted like a maukin

Doon the law the Whigs’ll fa’
A’ sae tapsalteerie
And the craw, the raven and the rocks’ll fla’
Frae the wids around my dearie

Coeffin Castle

Castle Coeffin is a ruin on the island of Lismore, an island in Loch Linnhe, in Argyll, on the west coast of Scotland.
Castle Coeffin is a ruin on the island of Lismore, an island in Loch Linnhe, in Argyll, on the west coast of Scotland.

Coeffin Castle was built in the XIII century, probably by the MacDougalls of Lorn. Lismore was an important site within their lordship, being the location of St. Moluag’s Cathedral, seat of the Bishop of Argyll. The first written evidence of the castle occurs in 1469–70, when it was granted to Sir Colin Campbell of Glenorchy by Colin Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll.

The ruins comprise an oblong hall-house and an irregularly shaped bailey. The great hall is an irregular rectangle, measuring 67 by 34 ft. The walls are from 6 ft 10 in to 7 ft 10 in. thick. The bailey was for the most part built at a later date than the hall. An external stair probably linked the entrance, in the north-east wall, to the bailey. A second door gave access to the sea to the south-west.

Sutton Hoo Buckle

Gold belt buckle from the ship-burial at Sutton Hoo Anglo-Saxon, early 7th century AD From Mound 1, Sutton Hoo, Suffolk, England.
Gold belt buckle from the ship-burial at Sutton Hoo
Anglo-Saxon, early 7th century AD
From Mound 1, Sutton Hoo, Suffolk, England.

An Eternal Example of Your Clemency

Andrew Birrell (after Henry Fuseli), Caractacus at the Tribunal of Claudius at Rome (1792).
Andrew Birrell (after Henry Fuseli), Caractacus at the Tribunal of Claudius at Rome (1792).

If the degree of my nobility and fortune had been matched by moderation in success, I would have come to this City as a friend rather than a captive, nor would you have disdained to receive with a treaty of peace one sprung from brilliant ancestors and commanding a great many nations. But my present lot, disfiguring as it is for me, is magnificent for you. I had horses, men, arms, and wealth: what wonder if I was unwilling to lose them? If you wish to command everyone, does it really follow that everyone should accept your slavery? If I were now being handed over as one who had surrendered immediately, neither my fortune nor your glory would have achieved brilliance. It is also true that in my case any reprisal will be followed by oblivion. On the other hand, if you preserve me safe and sound, I shall be an eternal example of your clemency.

— Tacitus, Annals 12:37.