Even to the Twentieth Generation

That is the mark of the Scot that he stands in an attitude to the past unthinkable in Englishmen, and remembers and cherishes the memory of his forebears, good and bad, and there burns alive in him a sense of identity with the dead, even to the twentieth generation.

— Robert Louis Stevenson.

Nobody Reads the Bible

Ronald Arbuthnott Knox.
Ronald Arbuthnott Knox.

Nobody reads the Bible; popes and bishops are always telling us to read the Bible, and when you produce a translation of the Bible, the only thing people complain about is your rendering of the diminutive snippets that are read out in church on Sundays. ‘Of course,’ they add, ‘the book is alright for private reading‘ — in a tone which implies that such a practice is both rare and unimportant.

Ronald Knox, On Englishing the Bible, Baronius Press (2012), p. 59.

9th Earl of Argyll with His Second Wife

Archibald Campbell, 9th Earl of Argyll with his second wife Anna; unknown artist; National Portrait Gallery, London.
Archibald Campbell, 9th Earl of Argyll, with his second wife Anna; unknown artist; National Portrait Gallery, London.

Queasy Stomachs

On the barque of Peter, those with queasy stomachs should keep clear of the engine room.

— Ronald Arbuthnott Knox.

Base Tyranny Quails at Thy Feet

Confederate Flag over fallen Fort Sumter, 1861.
Confederate Flag over fallen Fort Sumter, 1861.

Oh, Dixie, the land of King Cotton,
The home of the brave and the free;
A nation by freedom begotten,
The terror of despots to be.
Wherever thy banner is streaming,
Base tyranny quails at thy feet;
And liberty’s sunlight is beaming
In splendor of majesty sweet.

CHORUS:

Then three cheers for our Army so true,
Three cheers for our President too;
May our banner triumphantly wave
Over Dixie, the land of the brave!

When Liberty sounds her war rattle,
Demanding her right and her due,
The first land to rally to battle
Is Dixie, the home of the true.
Thick as leaves of the forest in summer,
Her brave sons will rise on each plain
And then strike till each vandal comer
Lies dead on the soil he would stain.

CHORUS

May the names of the dead that we cherish
Fill memory’s cup to the brim;
May the laurels we’ve won never perish,
Nor our stars of their glory grow dim.
May our states of the South never sever
But companions of freedom e’er be;
May they flourish Confed’rate forever,
The boast of the brave and the free.

— Dixie, the Land of King Cotton; words by Captain Hughes; tune by John Hill Hewitt.

Where All the Women are Strong, All the Men are Good Looking…

The inhabitants of this Island are for the most part of a good stature, strong and nimble, of a good complexion, live verie long, much addicted to hunting, arching, shooting, swimming, wherein they are expert. Their language for the most part is Irish, which is very empathetick, and for its antiquity Scaliger reckons it one of the material languages of Europe. They are good lovers of all sorts of mussick — have a good ear.

As to their women they are very modest, temperet in ther dyet and apparell, excessively grieved at the death of any near relation.

All the inhabitants here have a great veneration for their superiour, whom with the King they make particular mention of in ther privat devotion. Besides ther land rents, they ordinarilie send gratis to their superiours of the product of ther lands of all sorts. They honour ther ministers in a high degree, to whose care, under God, they owe ther freedom from idolatrie and many superstitious customes. Their traditions, wherein they are verie faithful, gives account that this Isle has been in time of the Danes and since, the scene of many warlik exploits. Some of ther genealogers can neither read nor writt, and yett will give an account of some passages in Buchanan his Chronicles, Plutarches Lives; yea, they will not onlie talk of what has passed in former ages, but in ther pedigree will almost ascend near Adam, as ifthey had an Ephemerides of all ther ancestors’ lives. They treat strangers with great civility, and give them such as the place does afford without ever demanding any payment. There are among them who excell in poetrie, and can give a satyre or panegyrick ex tempore on sight upon anie subject whatsomever.

Description of Sky from The Spottiswoode Miscellany: A Collection of Original Papers and Tracts, Illustrative Chiefly of the Civil and Ecclesiastical History of Scotland, Spottiswoode Society, 1845.

It Shall Be Unlawful

First National Confederate Flag captured by the 4th Minnesota Regiment Volunteer Infantry at the Battle of Jackson, Mississippi (obverse side).
First National Confederate Flag captured by the 4th Minnesota Regiment Volunteer Infantry at the Battle of Jackson, Mississippi (obverse side).
First National Confederate Flag captured by the 4th Minnesota Regiment Volunteer Infantry at the Battle of Jackson, Mississippi (reverse side).
First National Confederate Flag captured by the 4th Minnesota Regiment Volunteer Infantry at the Battle of Jackson, Mississippi (reverse side).

Improper use or mutilation of state or Confederate flag or emblem prohibited.—

(1) It shall be unlawful for any person, firm, or corporation to copy, print, publish, or otherwise use the flag or state emblem of Florida, or the flag or emblem of the Confederate States, or any flag or emblem used by the Confederate States or the military or naval forces of the Confederate States at any time within the years 1860 to 1865, both inclusive, for the purpose of advertising, selling, or promoting the sale of any article of merchandise whatever within this state.
(2) It shall also be unlawful for any person, firm, or corporation to mutilate, deface, defile, or contemptuously abuse the flag or emblem of Florida or the flag or emblem of the Confederate States by any act whatever.
(3) Nothing in this section shall be construed to prevent the use of any flag, standard, color, shield, ensign, or other insignia of Florida or of the Confederate States for decorative or patriotic purposes.
— Florida Statutes Chapter 256.051.

The Maist Honorable and Ancient Place in Scotland

Colmkill. Narrest this be twa myles of sea, layes the ile the Erische callit I-colm-Kill, that is, Sanct Colm’s ile, ane faire mayne ile of twa myle lange and maire, and ane myle braid, fertill, and fruitfull of corne and store, and guid for fishing. Within this ile there is a monastery of mounckes, ane uther of nuns, with a paroche-kirk, and sundrie uther chapells, dotat of auld by the kings of Scotland, and be Clandonald of the iyles. This abbay forsaid was the cathedrall kirk of the bishops of the iyles sen the tyme they were expulsed out of the ile of Man by the Englishmen; for within the ile of Man was ther cathedrall kirke and living of auld, as I have already said in the description of that ile. Within this ile of Colmkill, there is ane sanctuary also, or kirkzaird, callit in Erische Religoran, quhilk is a very fair kirkzaird, and weill biggit about with staine and lyme: into this sanctuary ther is three tombes of staine formit like little chapels, with ane braid gray marble or quhin staine in the gavill of ilk ane of the tombes. In the staine of ane tombe there is wretten in Latin letters, Tumulus Regum Scotiæ, that is, The tomb ore grave of the Scotts Kinges. Within this tombe, according to our Scotts and Erische cronickels, ther layes fortey-eight crouned Scotts kings, throughe the quhilk this ile hes beine richlie dotat be the Scotts kings, as we have said. The tombe on the south syde forsaid hes this inscription, Tumulus Regum Hyberniæ, that is, The tombe of the Irland kinges; for we have in our auld Ericshe cronickells, that there wes foure Irland kings eirdit in the said tombe. Upon the north syde of our Scotts tombe, the inscriptione beares, Tumulus Regum Norwegiæ, that is the tombe of the kings of Norroway; in the quhilk tombe, as we find in our ancient Erische cronickells, ther layes eight kings of Norroway; and als we find in our Erische cronickells, that Coelus king of Norroway commandit his nobils to take his bodey and burey it in Colm-Kill, if it chancit him to die in the iles, bot he was so discomfitit, that ther remained not so maney of his armey as would burey him ther; therfor he was eirded in Kyle, after he stroke ane field against the Scotts, and was vanquisht be them. Within this sanctuary also lyes the maist pairt of the Lords of the iles with ther lineage. Twa Clan Lynes with ther lynage, M’Kynnon and M’Guare with ther lynages, with sundrie uthers inhabitants of the hail iles, because this sanctuarey wes wont to be the sepulture of the best men of all the iles, and als of our kings as we have said; becaus it was the maist honorable and ancient place in Scotland in thair dayes, as we reid.

— Of the Western Isles of Scotland, called Hybrides; by Mr Donald Monro High Dean of the Isles who travelled through the most of them in the year 1549.

Follow Me

John Campbell,  1st Earl of Breadalbane and Holland, Viscount of Tay and Paintland, and Lord Glenorchy, Benderloch, Ormelie and Wick.
John “Iain Glas” Campbell, 1st Earl of Breadalbane and Holland, Viscount of Tay and Paintland, and Lord Glenorchy, Benderloch, Ormelie and Wick, 1696.

Là Inbhir Lòchaidh

Ruins of Inverlochy Castle near Inverlochy and Fort William, Highland, Scotland.
The ruin of Inverlochy Castle near Inverlochy and Fort William, Highland, Scotland.

Alasdair of sharp, biting blades,
if you had the heroes of Mull with you,
you would have stopped those who got away,
as the dulse-eating rabble took to their heels.

Alasdair, son of handsome Colla,
skilled hand at cleaving castles,
you put to flight the Lowland pale-face:
what kale they had taken came out again.

You remember the place called the Tawny Field?
It got a fine dose of manure;
not the dung of sheep or goats,
but Campbell blood well congealed.

 

 * * *

Sèist

Hì rim hò ro, hò ro leatha,
Hì rim hò ro, hò ro leatha,
Hì rim hò ro, hò ro leatha,
Chaidh an latha le Clann Dòmhnaill.

An cuala sibhse an tionndadh duineil
Thug an camp bha ‘n Cille Chuimein?
‘S fada chaidh ainm air an iomairt,
Thug iad às an naimhdean iomain.

Dhìrich mi moch madainn Dòmhnaich
Gu bràigh caisteil Inbhir Lòchaidh;
Chunnaic mi ‘n t-arm dol an òrdugh,
‘S bha buaidh a’ bhlàir le Clann Dòmhnaill.

Dìreadh a-mach glùn Chùil Eachaidh,
Dh’aithnich mi oirbh sùrd bhur tapaidh;
Ged bha mo dhùthaich na lasair,
‘S èirig air a’ chùis mar thachair.

Ged bhiodh iarlachd a’ Bhràghad
An seachd bliadhna seo mar tha e,
Gun chur, gun chliathadh, gun àiteach,
‘S math an riadh o bheil sinn pàighte.

Air do làimh-sa, Thighearna Labhair,
Ge mòr do bhòsd as do chlaidheamh,
‘S iomadh òglach chinne d’ athar
Tha ‘n Inbhir Lòchaidh na laighe.

‘S ioma fear gòrsaid is pillein,
Cho math ‘s a bha riamh dheth d’ chinneadh,
Nach d’ fhoad a bhotann thoirt tioram,
Ach foghlam snàmh air Bun Nimheis.

‘S iomadh fear aid agus pice
Agus cuilbheire chaoil dhìrich
Bha ‘n Inbhir Lòchaidh na shìneadh,
‘S bha luaidh nam ban à Cinn-tìr’ ann.

Sgeul a b’ àite ‘n uair a thigeadh,
Air Caimbeulaich nam beul sligneach,
H-uile dream dhiubh mur a thigeadh,
Le bualadh lann ‘n ceann gam briseadh.

‘N latha a shaoil iad a dhol leotha
‘S ann bha laoich gan ruith air reothadh:
‘S iomadh slaodanach mòr odhar,
A bheir aodann Ach’ an Todhair.

Ge b’ e dhìreadh Tom na h-Aire,
‘S iomadh spòg ùr bh’ air dhroch shailleadh,
Neul marbh air an suil gun anam
‘N dèidh an sgiùrsadh le lannan.

Thug sibh toiteal teth ma Lochaidh,
Bhith gam bualadh mu na srònaibh,
Bu lìonmhor claidheamh claisghorm còmhnard,
Bha bualadh ‘n lamhan Chlann Dòmhnaill.

Nuair chruinnich mòr dhragh na falachd,
‘N àm rùsgadh na ‘n greidlein tana,
Bha iongnan Dhuimhneach ri talamh,
An dèidh an lùithean a ghearradh.

‘S lionmhor corp nochte gun aodach
Tha nan sìneadh air Chnoc an Fhraoiche
On bhlàr an greasta na saoidhean,
Gu ceann Leitir Blàr a’ Chaorainn.

Dh’ innsinn sgeul eile le fìrinn,
Cho math ‘s nì clèireach a sgrìobhadh,
Chaidh na laoich ud gu ‘n dìcheall
‘S chuir iad maoim air luchd am mì-rùin.

Iain Mhuideartaich nan seòl soilleir,
Sheòladh an cuan ri là doillear,
Ort cha d’ fhuaireadh bristeadh coinne,
‘S ait’ leam Barra-breac fo d’ chomas.

Cha b’ e sud an siubhal cearbach
A thug Alasdair do dh’Albainn,
Creachadh, losgadh, agus marbhadh,
‘S leagadh leis Coileach Strath Bhalgaidh.

An t-eun dona chaill a cheutaidh,
An Sasunn, ‘n Albainn, ‘s an Èirinn,
Ite e à cùrr na sgèithe:
Cha miste leam ged a ghèill e.

Alasdair nan a geurlann sgaiteach,
Gheall thu ‘n dè a bhith cur às daibh,
Chuir thu ‘n retreuta seach an caisteal,
Seòladh glè mhath air an leantainn.

Alasdair nan geurlann guineach.
Nam biodh agad àrmuinn Mhuile;
Thug thu air na dh’fhalbh dhiubh fuireach,
‘S retreut air pràbar an duilisg.

Alasdair Mhic Cholla ghasda,
Làmh dheas a sgoltadh nan caisteal ;
Chuir thu ‘n ruaig air Ghallaibh glasa,
‘S ma dh’òl iad càil, gun chuir thu asd’ e.

‘M b’ aithne dhuibhse ‘n Goirtean Odhar?
‘S math a bha e air a thodhar,
Chan innear chaorach no ghobhar
Ach fuil Dhuibhneach an dèidh reothadh.

Sgrios oirbh mas truagh leam bhur càramh,
‘G èisteachd an-shocair bhur pàistean.
Caoidh a’ phanail bh’ anns an àraich,
Donnalaich bhàn Earra-ghàidheal.

— Iain Lom MacDonald (c. 1624–c. 1710).

Hae Ye Really Left the Guid Cause, and Turned Prelate?

When the Rev. Mr. Cowper [one of the ministers of Perth] was made Bishop of Galloway, an old woman, who had been one of his parishioners at Perth, and a favourite, could not be persuaded that her minister had deserted the Presbyterian cause, and resolved to satisfy herself. She paid him a visit in the Canongate, where he had his residence, as Dean of the Chapel Royal. The retinue of servants through which she passed staggered the good woman’s confidence; and, on being ushered into the room where the bishop sat in state, she exclaimed, ‘Oh Sir! what’s this? and hae ye really left the guid cause, and turned prelate? ‘Janet,’ said the bishop, ‘I have got new light upon these things.’ ‘So I see, Sir,’ replied Janet, ‘for whan ye was at Perth, ye had but ae candle, an’ now ye’ve got twa before ye — that’s a’ your new light.’

History of the Life of Melville, Thomas M’Crie.

The Five Articles of Perth

King James I of England and VI of Scotland, by Daniel Mytens, 1621. National Portrait Gallery, London: NPG 109.
King James I of England and VI of Scotland, by Daniel Mytens, 1621. National Portrait Gallery, London: NPG 109.
  1. That the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper should be received kneeling, and not in a sitting posture, as hitherto.
  2. That the communion might, in extreme cases, or to sick persons desiring it, be administered in private.
  3. That baptism also might, when deemed necessary, be privately administered.
  4. That children, or young persons, should be confirmed by a bishop — that is, make a personal avowal of the engagements entered into by god-fathers and god-mothers at the time of baptism.
  5. That the anniversary of the Nativity, of Christmas, the day on which our Saviour was born; Good Friday, or the Passion, when he suffered death for us; Easter, or the resurrection; Pentecost, or the descent of the Holy Spirit — should all be observed as solemn days.

The Five Articles of Perth.

…in modern times, when the mere ceremonial of divine worship (and Presbyterians must allow this) is supposed to be of little consequence compared to the temper and spirit in which we approach the Deity, the Five Articles of Perth seem to involve matters which might be dispensed or complied with, without being considered as essential to salvation;

— Sir Walter Scott.