Tae Win Oor Liberty

Crucifixion of St. Andrew; Carlo Braccesco, 1495; Galleria Franchetti, Ca’ d’Oro, Venice, Italy.
Crucifixion of St. Andrew; Carlo Braccesco, 1495; Galleria Franchetti, Ca’ d’Oro, Venice, Italy.

By the cross oor Andrew bore
By the sword oor William wore
By the crown our Robert swore
Tae win oor Liberty
Ca’ the falcon frae the glen,
Ca’ the eagle frae the ben
Ca’ the lion frae his den
Tae win oor Liberty

By the man wha’s faith was old
By the man they sold for gold
By the man they’ll never hold
Tae win oor Liberty
Ca’ the thieves o’ Liddesdale
Ca’ the spears o’ Annandale
Ca’ the brave o’ Yarrowvale
Tae win oor Liberty

By the arm that bends the bow
By the arm that plies the blow
By the arm that lays them low
Tae win oor Liberty
Ca’ the banners frae the West
Ca’ the raven frae his nest
Ca’ the clans that dance the best
Tae win oor Liberty

By the field that once was green
By the shield of silver sheen
By the sword in battle keen
Tae win oor Liberty
Bless the man wha’s faith we hold
Bless the man in chains they sold
Bless the man in cloth o’ gold
Wha’ won oor Liberty
Bless the man in cloth o’ gold
Wha’ won oor Liberty

Liberty, The Corries.

A Bond of Kindred

St. Martin's Cross; sterling silver; by Alexander Ritchie.
St. Martin’s Cross; sterling silver; by Alexander Ritchie.

Ask Everybody That Ain’t Asleep to Stand Right Up and Yell

Johnny Cash.
Johnny Cash.

Hey porter, hey porter, would you tell me the time?
How much longer will it be till we cross that Mason-Dixon line?
At daylight would ya tell that engineer to slow it down?
Or better still, just stop the train ’cause I wanna look around

Hey porter, hey porter, what time did ya say?
How much longer will it be till I can see the light of day?
When we hit Dixie will you tell that engineer to ring his bell?
And ask everybody that ain’t asleep to stand right up and yell

Hey porter, hey porter, it’s getting light outside
This old train is puffin’ smoke and I have to strain my eyes
But ask that engineer if he will blow his whistle please
‘Cause I smell frost on cotton leaves and I feel that southern breeze

Hey porter, hey porter, please get my bags for me
I need nobody to tell me now that we’re in Tennessee
Go tell that engineer to make that lonesome whistle scream
We’re no so far from home so take it easy on the steam

Hey porter, hey porter, please open up the door
When they stop the train I’m gonna get off first ’cause I can’t wait no more
Tell that engineer I said thanks a lot and I didn’t mind the fare
I’m gonna set my feet on southern soil and breathe that southern air

Hey Porter, Johnny Cash.

An Endeavoured Woman

She was an endeavoured woman, very powerful, very prudent, wise, very honest, chaste, devout, discreet, truthful, clear, without deceit. Who could count the excellences of this very Catholic and happy Queen, always very worthy of praises.

Andrés Bernáldez of  of Queen Isabelle I of Castile and León.

To Conquer Is to Live Enough

Battle flag of the 5th Texas Regiment, sewn by Maude Young, a Houston botanist and school principal whose son had enlisted in the Texas Brigade. The flag was emblazoned with the regiment’s name and the Latin motto Vivere Sat Vincere, or “To conquer is to live enough.” It was presented to the regiment in June 1862, and served as the regimental colors two weeks later at the Battle of Gaines Mill. The flag was sent away to be decorated with battle honors after the Peninsula Campaign, and the regiment carried their earlier Lone Star flag (TSLAC 306-4042) at Second Manassas and Antietam. After that flag was sent back to Texas for display, the regiment chose to use Mrs. Young’s flag through the rest of the war. As part of Hood’s Texas Brigade, the regiment fought at Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, and Knoxville.
Battle flag of the 5th Texas Regiment, sewn by Maude Young, a Houston botanist and school principal whose son had enlisted in the Texas Brigade. The flag was emblazoned with the regiment’s name and the Latin motto Vivere Sat Vincere, or “To conquer is to live enough.” It was presented to the regiment in June 1862, and served as the regimental colors two weeks later at the Battle of Gaines Mill. The flag was sent away to be decorated with battle honors after the Peninsula Campaign, and the regiment carried their earlier Lone Star flag (TSLAC 306-4042) at Second Manassas and Antietam. After that flag was sent back to Texas for display, the regiment chose to use Mrs. Young’s flag through the rest of the war. As part of Hood’s Texas Brigade, the regiment fought at Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, and Knoxville.

A Big Electric Blanket?

Push back against the age as hard as it pushes against you. What people don’t realize is how much religion costs. They think faith is a big electric blanket, when of course it is the cross.

— The Habit of Being: The Letters of Flannery O’Connor, ed. Sally Fitzgerald (New York: Farrar, Straus, Giroux, 1979), p. 229.

Preferring Justice to Cash

[The royal knight Alvaro Yáñez de Lugo] was condemned to be beheaded, although he offered forty thousand ducados for the war against the Moors to the court so that these monies spare his life. This matter was discussed with the queen, and there were some who told her to pardon him, since these funds for the war were better than the death of that man, and her highness should take them. But the queen, preferring justice to cash, very prudently refused them; and although she could have confiscated all his goods, which were many, she did not take any of them to avoid any note of greed, or that it be thought that she had not wished to pardon him in order to have his goods; instead, she gave them all to the children of the aforesaid knight.

— Lucio Marineo Sículo of Queen Isabelle I of Castile and León.