Æbudæ Insulæ

Map of the Hebrides, Joan Blaeu, 1654.
Map of the Hebrides, Joan Blaeu, 1654.

Little Wat Ye Wha’s Coming

The Gathering Stone, which tradition variously holds as the location of the Jacobite clans' standard on the field at Sheriffmuir, or the spot where John Campbell, Duke of Argyll, and commander of the Government forces, watched the battle.
The Gathering Stone, which tradition variously holds as the location of the Jacobite clans’ standard on the field at Sheriffmuir, or the spot where John Campbell, Duke of Argyll, and commander of the Government forces, watched the battle.

Little wat ye wha’s coming,
Little wat ye wha’s coming,
Little wat ye wha’s coming,

Jock and Tam and a’s coming.

Duncan’s coming, Donald’s coming,
Colin’s coming, Ronald’s coming,
Dougald’s coming, Lauchlan’s coming,
Alaster and a’s coming.

Borland and his men’s coming,
Cameron and M’Lean’s coming,
Gordon and M’Gregor’s coming,
Ilka Dunywastle’s coming.
Little wat ye wha’s coming (ter).
M’Gillavry o’ Drumglass is coming.

Wigton’s coming, Nithsdale’s coming,
Carnwath’s coming. Kenmure’s coming,
Derwentwater and Foster’s coming,
Withrington and Nairn’s coming.
Little wat ye wha’s coming (ter),
Blythe Cowhill and a’ coming.

The laird of McIntosh is coming,
McRabie and McDonald’s coming,
McKenzie and McPherson’s coming,
And the wild McCraw’s coming.
Little wat ye wha’s coming (ter),
Donald Gun and a’s coming.

They gloom, they glour, they look sae big,
At ilka stroke they’ll fell a Whig:
They’ll fright the fuds of the Pockpuds,
For mony a buttock bare’s coming.
Little wat ye wha’s coming (ter),
Jock and Tam and a’s coming.

— The Chevalier’s Muster-Roll, from David Herd’s “Ancient and Modern Scotish Songs,” Volume I, page 117, 1769, and James Hogg’s “Jacobite Relics,” Vol. I, N°90, 1819.

How Hedged About with Secrecy

Esteem no man for his good looks, nor for his outward show despise him; yonder bee is an inconsiderable creature, and yet there is a world of sweetness in the harvest she wins. Plume not thyself when thou goest bravely clad, nor pride thyself in thy brief hour of greatness. Of wonder and of praise what else is worthy, but the doings of the most High? And these, how hedged about with secrecy! Kings a many have lost their thrones, to pretenders they never dreamed of; great ones a many have fallen full low, and their glory has passed to others.

Ecclesiasticus xi. 2-6.

George Dance

Photograph of reunion of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest's Escort, Lynchburg, Moore County, Tennessee, circa 1900.
Photograph of reunion of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest’s Escort, Lynchburg, Moore County, Tennessee, circa 1900. Note the presence of George Dance (1 January 1842 – 12 November 1924) [far right], a slave of Dr. Stephen Edward Hinton Dance, who was the Chief Surgeon of the 8th Tennessee Infantry. George Dance applied for Confederate pension number C46 at Moore County, Tennessee, receiving ten dollars a month for his service. “Uncle George” was a regular fixture around Fayetteville and Lynchburg for years, and can be found in many period photographs.

Except the Three Sacred Fingers

"Sacrosancta Lateranensis ecclesia omnium urbis et orbis ecclesiarum mater et caput" ("Most Holy Lateran Church, of all the churches in the city and the world, the mother and head.") Inscription on the façade of the Papal Archbasilica of St. John Lateran, Rome.
“Sacrosancta Lateranensis ecclesia omnium urbis et orbis ecclesiarum mater et caput” (“Most Holy Lateran Church, of all the churches in the city and the world, the mother and head.”) Inscription on the façade of the Papal Archbasilica of St. John Lateran, Rome.

What Alanus Copus Nicholas Harpsfield and Father Henry Fitzsimons, of Dublin, have related about John Travers, an Irish doctor of sacred theology, who fell in Henry’s or Elizabeth’s time (I have not definitely ascertained which) is worth repeating. This man wrote something against the English heresy, in which he maintained the jurisdiction and authority of the Pope. Being arraigned for this before the king’s court, and questioned by the judge on the matter, he fearlessly replied — “With these fingers,” said he, holding out the thumb, index, and middle fingers, of his right hand, “those were written by me, and for this deed in so good and holy a cause I neither am nor will be sorry.” Thereupon being condemned to death, amongst other atrocious punishments inflicted, that glorious hand was cut off by the executioner and thrown into the fire and burnt, except the three sacred fingers by which he had effected those writings, and which the flames, — however piled on and stirred up, could not consume.

— Chapters towards a History of Ireland in the reign of Elizabeth, Chapter II,
Philip O’Sullivan Beare.

Collectio Canonum Hibernensis

Folio 15v of Codex 210 of the library of the Domkapitel of Cologne, an except of Collectio Canonum Hibernensis, a systematic Latin collection of Continental canon law, scriptural and patristic excerpts, and Irish synodal and penitential decrees, thought to have been compiled by two Irish scholars working in the 8th century: Cú Chuimne of Iona (died 747) and Ruben of Dairinis (died 725).
Folio 15v of Codex 210 of the library of the Domkapitel of Cologne, an except of the Collectio Canonum Hibernensis, a systematic Latin collection of Continental canon law, scriptural and patristic excerpts, and Irish synodal and penitential decrees, thought to have been compiled by two Irish scholars working in the 8th century: Cú Chuimne of Iona (died 747) and Ruben of Dairinis (died 725).

Receiving Authority There

St. Patrick poured forth to God the following prayer: ‘O Lord Jesus Christ, lead me, I beseech thee, to the seat of the holy Roman Church, that, receiving authority there to preach with confidence Thy sacred truths, the Irish nation may, through my ministry, be gathered to the fold of Christ.’ And soon after, being about to proceed to Ireland, this man of God, Patrick, went as he had wished to Rome, the head of all churches, and having asked and received the apostolic blessing, he returned, pursuing the same road by which he had journeyed thither.

— Probus, Vita S. Patricii.

Reality Upturned into Perversity

Crucifix by Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni, Santa Maria del Santo Spirito di Firenze, Florence.
Crucifix by Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni, Santa Maria del Santo Spirito di Firenze, Florence.

We have heard so much in the past year about the mercy of God, as if the mercy of God does not depend on the justice of God. Without justice there is no mercy. The mission of the Church is not primarily to proclaim the mercy of God. The mission of the Church is to proclaim Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior. The mercy of God is surely seen and exemplified once and for all in the Cross of Jesus Christ. There is no greater symbol of God’s mercy and love. Those silly “resurrected Christs” that are placed on a cross over an altar in some Catholic churches are a product of sentimentality and denial of the justice of God. And yet when one looks at the Cross one sees there the terrible, horrible, judgment of God on this world of sin, that God would have to have his Son die in this way: what does that say about this world, about you and me? The obvious answer is quite negative. But you see, the deepest answer to that question is Love, there is the answer. But not the cheap love the world would have us believe in, love defined as what I want to do, love defined apart from the laws of God, love defined so as to upturn reality into perversity, a false love that is doomed to hell, as Dante saw, as Christ told us, as St. Paul wrote, that is doomed to death, for it is the opposite of Love.

— From homily on the Last Sunday after Pentecost, 2013,
Fr. Richard G. Cipolla,
Saint Mary’s Norwalk, Connecticut.

(h/t to Rorate Cæli)

The Cat’s Back

Knockfarrel Hill or Drumchatt (Druimchat) or "the Cat's Back", a ridge to the southeast of Strathpeffer, Ross and Cromarty, Highland, Scotland.
Knockfarrel Hill or Drumchatt (Druimchat) or “the Cat’s Back”, a ridge to the southeast of Strathpeffer, Ross and Cromarty, Highland, Scotland.

Thereafter, some of the islanders and the Clandonald met with Clankeinzie at a place in Ross called Drumchatt, where ensued a sharp skirmish; bot in the even the ilanders wer put to the worst, and chassed out of Rosse at that tyme.

— Genealogical History of the Earldom of Sutherland, Sir Robert Gordon, 1625.

Archbishop Lefebvre Himself

Fr. John Hunwicke.
Fr. John Hunwicke.

[T]he heart of Archbishop Lefebvre himself would have been melted by the entire liturgical effect. Fr. John Hunwicke on the newly-approved Ordinariate Ordo Missæ Vigil Mass to be debuted on the eve of Advent Sunday at the Church of the Holy Rood in Oxford.

* * *

Fr. Hunwicke has evidently resumed blogging at Fr Hunwicke’s Mutual Enrichment. Deo gratias! Fr. Hunwicke was for nearly three decades at Lancing College; where he taught Latin and Greek language and literature, was Head of Theology, and Assistant Chaplain. He has served three curacies, been a Parish Priest, and Senior Research Fellow at Pusey House in Oxford. He is now incardinated into the Personal Ordinariate of our Lady of Walsingham.

The Gentle Birth of Colum, Our Cleric

Stained glass window in Iona Abbey depicting St. Columba.
Stained glass window in Iona Abbey depicting St. Columba.

Kal. iv. A.D. 518

Battle of Detna, in Droma-Bregh, in which fell Ardgal, son of Conall Crimhthann, son of Niall. Muircertach Mac Earca, and Colga, son of Cloith, son of Crunn, son of Fedhlimidh, King of Airghiall, were the victors.

Buti, son of Bronach, died, and Colum Cille was born, of whom was said:—

  1. The gentle birth of Colum, our cleric,
    To-day over noble Erinn;
    On the same day occurred — no arrogant saying—
    The bright, victorious death of the son of Bronach.

Ailill, Abbot of Ardmacha, slept.

Beoid, Bishop of Ardcarna, rested.

— Chronicon Scotorum, Annal CS518.

The Great House

The Great House at Shirley Plantation, Charles City County, Virginia, c. 1900-1906.
The Great House at Shirley Plantation, Charles City County, Virginia, c. 1900-1906.