Arms of the Republika Srbija

Arms of Serbia.
Arms of Serbia.

Gules, a bicephalic eagle Argent armed Or, two fleurs-de-lys Or. Overall an escutcheon Gules, a cross Argent between four firesteels Argent. All crowned with a royal crown.

The arms are draped with a crimson (porphyry) mantle embroidered gold, with a golden fringe, tied up with golden braid with tassels of the same, lined with ermine. Above the mantle is a pavilion gules again with nine fleur-de-lis or and crowned with a golden crown.

The arms of Serbia are based on the family arms of the former Obrenović dynasty (adopted in 1882) and features the white bicephalic eagle of the Nemanjić dynasty. An ermine cape of the style once worn by kings is featured in the background. The double-headed eagle has been used since Byzantine era; the Serbian cross has been used since the XII century.

Arms of the Xunta de Galicia

Arms of Galicia.
Arms of Galicia.

The coat of arms of Galicia is described in the Spanish Law 5 of May 29, 1984, the Law of the symbols of Galicia.

The coat of arms of Galicia includes, enclosed in a field of azure, a chalice of gold with a silver host, accompanied by seven silver crosses, three on each side and one in the center of the shield (representative of the seven historic provinces of Galicia).

The royal crown in gules, enclosed in a golden ring set with precious stones, made up of eight acanthus leaf fleurons, out of which five are visible. Each leaf is set with pearls, and five tiaras are born from them to converge in a globe of azure, with the semi-meridian and the equator in gold, topped by a golden cross.

Unofficial Flag and Arms of the Collectivité Territoriale de Saint-Pierre-et-Miquelon

(Unofficial) Flag of Saint Pierre and Miquelon. Its field is blue with a yellow ship, said to be the Grande Hermine, which brought Jacques Cartier to Saint-Pierre on 15 June 1536. Three square fields placed along the hoist recall the origin of most inhabitants of the islands, from top to bottom, Basques, Bretons, and Lower Normans. The top left flag is the Basque flag, known as the “Ikurriña”. This unofficial flag was likely designed by André Paturel, a local business owner who adapted the coat of arms designed by one Léon Joner.
Unofficial Arms of St. Pierre and Miquelon.

The Stowe Armorial

The Stowe Armorial (often referred to erroneously as the Grenville Diptych) was produced for Richard Temple-Grenville, Marquess of Chandos, the son of the first Duke of Buckingham and Chandos, between 1822 and 1839. The armorial shows 719 quarterings of the family which include, among others, ten variations of the English Royal arms, the arms of Spencer, De Clare, Valence, Mowbray, Mortimer, and De Grey.

Spem Reduxit

Flag of the Canadian Province of New Brunswick.
Arms of the Canadian Province of New Brunswick.

The Total Defiance of Expence

Armoury Hall in Inveraray Castle.

My acquaintance, the Reverend Mr John M’Aulay, one of the ministers of Inveraray, and brother to our good friend at Calder, came to us this morning, and accompanied us to the castle, where I presented Dr Johnson to the Duke of Argyle. We were shewn through the house; and I never shall forget the impression made upon my fancy by some of the ladies’ maids tripping about in neat morning dresses. After seeing for a long time little but rusticity, their lively manner, and gay inviting appearance, pleased me so much, that I thought, for the moment, I could have been a knight-errant for them. [Footnote: On reflection, at the distance of several years, I wonder that my venerable fellow-traveller should have read this passage without censuring my levity.]

We then got into a low one-horse chair, ordered for us by the duke, in which we drove about the place. Dr Johnson was much struck by the grandeur and elegance of this princely seat. He thought, however, the castle too low, and wished it had been a story higher. He said, ‘What I admire here, is the total defiance of expence.’ I had a particular pride in shewing him a great number of fine old trees, to compensate for the nakedness which had made such an impression on him on the eastern coast of Scotland.

When we came in, before dinner, we found the duke and some gentlemen in the hall. Dr Johnson took much notice of the large collection of arms, which are excellently disposed there. I told what he had said to Sir Alexander McDonald, of his ancestors not suffering their arms to rust. ‘Well,’ said the doctor, ‘but let us be glad we live in times when arms MAY rust. We can sit to-day at his grace’s table, without any risk of being attacked, and perhaps sitting down again wounded or maimed.’

The Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides by James Boswell;
Monday, 25th October 1773: Inveraray.