Plates from The Heraldry of the Campbells, Volume II

Plate VII. from G. Harvey Johnston, The Heraldry of the Campbells, Vol. II, Edinburgh, 1921.
Plate VII. from G. Harvey Johnston, The Heraldry of the Campbells, Vol. II, Edinburgh, 1921.
Plate V. from G. Harvey Johnston, The Heraldry of the Campbells, Vol. II, Edinburgh, 1921.
Plate VI. from G. Harvey Johnston, The Heraldry of the Campbells, Vol. II, Edinburgh, 1921.

Arms of Loudoun County, Virginia

Seal of Loudoun County, Virginia.
Seal of Loudoun County, Virginia.

Adopted by the Board of Supervisors on 16 January 1968, the arms of Loudoun County, Virginia, were modelled after those of its namesake, John Campbell, 4th Earl of Loudoun, Commander-in-Chief, North America, and Governor General of Virginia (1756-1759). The arms were recorded by the College of Arms in London after suitable differencing — the addition to the shield of an embattled bordure, commemorating President James Monroe and the Monroe doctrine, “Vert and gutty Argent,” representing the county’s agricultural and dairying interests, and the alteration of Campbell of Loudoun’s motto (by a single letter) from “I Byde My Tyme” to “I Byde My Time.” The county celebrated its new coat of arms on 14 March 1968 with a gala event featuring an official presentation from the Rouge Dragon Pursuivant, Sir Conrad Swan.

Fostering: Argyll and Glenorchy

Archibald Campbell, 9th Earl of Argyll with his second wife Anna; unknown artist; National Portrait Gallery, London.
Archibald Campbell, 9th Earl of Argyll with his second wife Anna; unknown artist; National Portrait Gallery, London.

The following correspondence, reproduced in Cosmo Nelson Innes’ Preface to The Black Book of Taymouth: with Other Papers from the Breadalbane Charter Room, Edinburgh, 1850, intimately details the fostering of Archibald Campbell, 9th Earl of Argyll, son of Archibald Campbell, 8th Earl — and 1st (and only) Marquess — of Argyll, by Sir Colin Campbell, 8th Laird of Glenorchy and his wife, Juliana Campbell, daughter of Hugh Campbell, 1st Lord Campbell of Loudoun.

* * *

From Sir COLIN CAMPBELL of Glenurchy to ARCHIBALD LORD LORNE.

MY NOBLE LORD AND CHEIFF,

I receauit your lordships letter from Archibald Campbell schawing me that syndrie of your lordships freindis wer most desyrous to have your lordships eldest sone in fostering, yet for diuerss respectis your lordship wes better pleasit to have him brought vp with me, quich I acknowledge is a great testimonie both of your lordships trust and love, and I hop in God evir so to approve myself to be most willing and desyrous to deserue both. And in regard that your lordship and it may be your lordships lady have occasioun to be ane great part of this sommer in the Lawlandis, gif it may stand with your lordships pleasour, I desyre that your lordships sone may come heir to me about the 17 or 18 of Maii nixt, quhair, God willing, he sall have all the cairfull attendance that may ly in my powar to give him. And in regaird that I am not weill able to travell myself so far a iourney, I intend to send my wyfe and some vther of my friendis to be his convoy, quhairwith I thought guid to acquaint your lordship, hoping that agane that tyme your lordship will provyde some discrit woman and ane sufficient man quha hes bothe Irisch and Englisch and will have a care not onlie to attend him, but sometymes lykewayes to learne him and quhat else may concern him quhill he is in my company. God willing, my wyfe and I sail have a speciall care thairof. As for the rest of the particularis contenit in your lordships letter, I sail ansuer thame at my wyfes coming to your lordship or vtherwayes at my meiting with your lordship the aucht of Junii as your lordship hes desyrit at Stirling, to quhich time with the remembrans of my humell seruice to your lordships nobill lady, and evir I remane

Your lordships assurit frend and kinsman to my powar to serue,

[COLIN CAMPBELL of Glenurquhay. 1633.]

LORD LORNE to GLENURCHY.
For my loving cousing the Lard of Gleanorquhay.

LOVING CUSIN,

Man propons bot God dispons. I intended to heave gon presentlie to Inuerraray bot I had ane letter within thir two or three days from the Thesaurar Traquair desyring me to be in Edinburgh so soon as I could, quhiche hes altered my resolution that my familie cannot stur till it pleas God I returne. I will assoor you your foster longs very much to see you and doethe not dar to tell he had rather be thair nor her, and I assoor you he shall heave his choice, bot as you may see be this letter of his grandfathers the Erle of Morton that he intends to be in Scotland so shortlie, his mother desyrs if it pleas God to heaue hir childring togither till that tym, to draw her father her; and if wee hear any contrair advertisment of his dyet you shall immediatlie heaue him (as Archie calles it) home. So remembring my service to your lady I rest

Your loving cusin,

LORNE.

Rosneithe last May.

ARCHIBALD CAMPBELL of LORNE to GLENURCHY.
To my lowing foster-father and respected freind the Lard of Glenvrqhey, thes.

LOUING FREIND,

Louing foster-father, I thoght good to wryt thir few lyns to yow to shawe yow that I am in good health and am vearie sorie that ye wryt not for me and I long weri much to sie yow; and as ye wold wis me to be well and to come to yow, send to me in all the heast and diligence ye can, Duncan Archibald and tuey horse with him, on to Mr Johen and on for my cariage: and prays and requests yow to send them in all the heast ye can, and I wil looke for them that they may be heir a Fryday or at the fardest at Setterday at night: and take it not in anay vncounes that I send not back the ansuere of the letter that I got in Edinbruch. I could not stay because I was in heast; and bring my commendations to your shelf and to yowr wyf and houpes that I wil seie yow my shelf shortlie, if ye doe yowr deutie, not duting but ye wildoe the same, comiting yow to Gods protection for euer. So I rest

Yours at pouer,

ARCHIBALD LORD OF LORNE.

Wryten at Inderaray,
the thretie day of September.

From the LADY LORNE to GLENURCHY.
To my much respectit and gud freind the Laird of Glenurquhy.

LUFFEING FREIND,

I haife sent this bearar to knowe how yea and my sone are in healthe, and to shaw you thatt all freindis heare are weall. I heair my sone begines to wearye of the Irishe langwadge. I intreatt yow to cause holde hime to the speakeing of itt, for since he hes bestowed so long tyme and paines in the getting of itt, I sould be sory he lost it now with leasines in not speaking of itt; bott this I know yea wilbe more cairfull as in ewery thing that concernes hime, so that I will fully leaffe him to your awin caire; only prayeing the Lord to giffe ane blessing to all the meanes of his educatioune: And so I shall still remain

Your most assurett friend,

MARGARET DOUGLAS.

Rosnethe,
the 14 of December 1637.

GLENURCHY to LORNE.

MOST HONOREDE,

I have desyrit my brother Roberte to schau your lordship in quhat manere Maister Jhone Makleine misbehauis himself. I am sorie that I haue caus to do it, bot the respect I carie to my lorde and to your lordship and the loue I haue to your lordships sone makis to do so. Quhen your lordship plaissis your lordship may lede my lorde knau it, and I thinke it may be best remediete be provydinge in deu tyme on to supplie Maister Jhone his place, and your Lordship knauis it is requisit he be ane discreite man that is ane scollar and that can speike both Inglis and Erise, quharof I think thair may be hade in Argyll. Your lordship may do heirine as my lorde and your lordship thinks expediente. Your lordships sone is veill and in guide healthe, praysit be God. The Lord continou the same. So vissinge your lordship all prosperitie I remain

Your lordships assurite and affectionat friende to serue you,

GLENURQHAY.

Balloche the          [1638.]

ARGYLL to GLENURCHY.
For my loving Cusin the Laird of Glenwrquhy.

LOVING CUSIN,

Since it hath pleased God to call my father to his eternall rest, I doubt not bot you kno als weall as I can desyr you what is fitting for yourself to doe. Onli in this I desyr you to suffer your foster with you to wear murning. And so ever mak use of me as

Your most affectionat cusin to my power

ARGYLL.

Rosneithe,
4 September [1638.]

The COUNTESS OF ARGYLL to GLENURCHY.
To my loveing freind the Laird of Glenvrquhy.

LOVING FREIND,

Accordeing to this other lettre of my lordis, I will earnestlie desyire you to send heire my sonne, and to have him at your house in Glenvrquhy on Frayday at night the tuentie ane day of this instant preceislie, and I shall appoynt folkes to meitt him thair on Satterday in the morneing, for bringing him alonges heir. I hoipe ye wilbe cairfull to send sufficient company with him and to caus prowyd some secure place be the way, quhar he may be that night he comes frome you. So referring all to your cair, exspecteing assuredlie that ye will send him the tyme foirsaid,

I rest your loving freind,
MARGARET DOUGLAS.

Inverrarey,
14 Junii 1639.

Sir Colin and Lady Juliana Campbell

Sir Colin Campbell, 8th Laird of Glenorchy (d. 1640); engraved (1798) and published in <em>Gallery of Eminent Persons of Scotland</em> by John Pinkerton, 1799.
Sir Colin Campbell, 8th Laird of Glenorchy (d. 1640); engraved (1798) and published in Gallery of Eminent Persons of Scotland by John Pinkerton, 1799.

Sir Colin Campbell, 2nd Baronet (c. 1577–1640), 8th Laird of Glenorchy, was the son of Sir Duncan Campbell, 1st Baronet and Lady Jane Stewart, a daughter of John Stewart, 4th Earl of Atholl. Sir Duncan was the 7th Laird of the Glenorchy branch of Clan Campbell, and his shrewd, ruthless dealings as “Black Duncan” had capped a spectacular rise in the family fortunes to national prominence in Scotland, with a baronetcy in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia. Sir Colin was a man of general culture, a patron of the arts, and devoted much effort to the family seat of Balloch Castle. He also improved Barcaldine Castle.

Lady Juliana Campbell, wife of 8th Laird of Glenorchy (b. 1581); engraved (1798) and published in <em>Gallery of Eminent Persons of Scotland</em> by John Pinkerton, 1799.
Lady Juliana Campbell, wife of 8th Laird of Glenorchy (b. 1581); engraved (1798) and published in Gallery of Eminent Persons of Scotland by John Pinkerton, 1799.

He married Juliana Campbell, daughter of Sir Hugh Campbell, 1st Lord Campbell of Loudoun and Margaret Gordon. Childless, they fostered Archibald Campbell (later 9th Earl of Argyll). This fostering repeated in the next generation that of Archibald’s father Archibald Campbell, 1st Marquess of Argyll, who became chief of Clan Campbell, and had been happily fostered (a custom of the period, but also with political ramifications within the clan) by Sir Duncan.

In 1633, Sir Colin Campbell commissioned an artist to supply him with a series of portraits of Scottish kings and queens, as well as portraits of eight of his own male predecessors. These, totalling forty-one, were for the decoration of his tower house of Balloch (later Taymouth Castle); in the records of the house, the painter, who stayed for eight months, is simply referred to as “the German painter.”

Item, the said Sir Coline bestowit and gave to ane Germane painter quhom he entertanit in his house aucht moneth, and that for painting of threttie broads of the Kingis of Scotland, and of Great Britannie, France and Ireland, and tua of thair Majesteis Queins of gude memorie, and of the said Sir Coline his awin and his predicessors portraitis, quhilkis portraitis ar sett up in the hall and chalmer of Daes of the house of Balloch, the soume of ane thousand pundis.

Black Book of Taymouth.

Sir Colin was also the foremost patron of George Jamesone, who in 1634 painted a series of the Ladies of Glenorchy (e.g. Invereil House, Lothian; remainder dispersed at sale, Invereil House, 3 March 1969), a set of eight head-and-shoulders portraits, each in a feigned oval surround, of the wives of former Glenorchy lairds: these were intended as companion pieces to the genealogical set of Campbell’s male predecessors that had been painted at his Taymouth home during the previous year by the unknown German artist.