Pour le Christ et le roi!

Ô Canada! Terre de nos aïeux,
Ton front est ceint de fleurons glorieux!
Car ton bras sait porter l’épée,
Il sait porter la croix!
Ton histoire est une épopée
Des plus brillants exploits.Et ta valeur, de foi trempée,
Protégera nos foyers et nos droits
Protégera nos foyers et nos droits.

Sous l’œil de Dieu, près du fleuve géant,
Le Canadien grandit en espérant,
Il est né d’une race fière,
Béni fut son berceau;
Le ciel a marqué sa carrière
Dans ce monde nouveau.
Toujours guidé par Sa lumière,
Il gardera l’honneur de son drapeau,
Il gardera l’honneur de son drapeau.

De son patron, précurseur du vrai Dieu,
Il porte au front l’auréole de feu;
Ennemi de la tyrannie,
Mais plein de loyauté,
Il veut garder dans l’harmonie
Sa fière liberté.
Et par l’effort de son génie,
Sur notre Sol asseoir la vérité,
Sur notre Sol asseoir la vérité!

Amour sacré du trône et de l’autel
Remplis nos cœurs de ton souffle immortel.
Parmi les races étrangères
Notre guide est la foi;
Sachons être un peuple de frères,
Sous le joug de la loi;
Et répétons comme nos pères
Le cri vainqueur: « Pour le Christ et le Roi »
Le cri vainqueur: « Pour le Christ et le Roi. »

So Bid Farewell

The Idiot.
Stan Rogers.

I often take these nightshift walks when the foreman’s not around.
I turn my back on the cooling stacks and make for open ground.
Far out beyond the tank-farm fence where the gas-flare makes no sound,
I forget the stink and I always think back to that Eastern town.

I remember back six years ago, this Western life I chose.
And every day, the news would say some factory’s going to close.
Well, I could have stayed to take the dole, but I’m not one of those.
I take nothing free, and that makes me an idiot, I suppose.

So I bid farewell to the Eastern town I never more will see;
But work I must, so I eat this dust and breathe refinery.
Oh I miss the green and the woods and streams, and I don’t like cowboy clothes,
But I like being free, and that makes me an idiot, I suppose.

So come all you fine young fellows who’ve been beaten to the ground.
This western life’s no paradise, but it’s better than lying down.
Oh, the streets aren’t clean, and there’s nothing green, and the hills are dirty brown,
But the government dole will rot your soul back there in your home town.

So bid farewell to the Eastern town you never more will see.
There’s self-respect and a steady cheque in this refinery.
You will miss the green and the woods and streams and the dust will fill your nose.
But you’ll be free, and — just like me — an idiot, I suppose.

Na Gàidheil agus an Ainmean-Àite an Albainn Nuaidh

www.nagaidheil.ca

I recently stumbled upon this wonderful resource for Gàidhlig toponyms in Nova Scotia, Na Gàidheil Agus an Ainmean-Àite an Albainn Nuaidh (The Gaels and Their Place Names in Nova Scotia), a project of the Gaelic Affairs office of the Province of Nova Scotia.

This is Your Flag

Recruitment poster for the 207th (Ottawa-Carleton) Battalion, CEF.
Recruitment poster for the 207th (Ottawa-Carleton) Battalion, CEF.

This is your flag — Fight for it.

This slogan of the 207th has
been made the title of a
stirring song dedicated to
the 207th Battalion — Read it —

Words by Miss Esther Knott.
Music by Donald Heins.

How would you care to see the old flag down, boys,
Would you care to see her dragged in the mire?

Could you bear to hear it said
That you crawled beneath the bed,
While the rest of us were standing up to fire?

Would you care to hear the Kaiser was in England;
That his fleet was on the way to Old Quebec?

Would you care to have the girls
With the pretty golden curls,
See you get a German bayonet in the neck?

Chorus:

Come on the (sic) boys, this is your flag,
And it surely means to you
That the world expects to see your tag
And believes that you’ll be true.
Come on, boys, this is your flag,
Show the red blood — and the blue —
For the men are white —
Who join the fight —
And surely you’ll be true.

Bight

Egmont Bight, looking towards the Freshwater Steps promontory, Dorset, U.K.
Egmont Bight, looking towards the Freshwater Steps promontory, Dorset, U.K.

In geography, bight has two meanings. A bight can be simply a bend or curve in any geographical feature — usually a bend or curve in the line between land and water.

Alternatively, the term can refer to a large (and often only slightly receding) bay. It is distinguished from a sound by being shallower. Traditionally explorers defined a bight as a bay that could be sailed out of on a single tack in a square-rigged sailing vessel, regardless of the direction of the wind (typically meaning the apex of the bight is less than 25 degrees from the edges).

* * *

Trinity Bight is a large area of the Northwestern portion of Trinity Bay, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. The bight contains the communities of New Bonaventure, Old Bonaventure, Trouty, Dunfield, Goose Cove, Trinity, Trinity East, Port Rexton, Champney’s Arm, Champney’s West, Champney’s East, and English Harbour.

Trinity Bight, Newfoundland.
Trinity Bight, Newfoundland.

Long May It Sway, O’er Bight and Bay

The "Pink, White and Green" Newfoundland Tricolour flag.
The “Pink, White and Green” Newfoundland Tricolour flag.

The pink, the rose of England shows,
The green St. Patrick’s emblem, bright
While in between, the spotless sheen
of Andrew’s cross displays the white.

Then hail the pink, the white, the green,
Our patriot flag long may it stand.
Our Sirelands twine, their emblems trine,
To form the flag of Newfoundland!

Fling out the flag, o’er creek and cragg,
Pink, white and green, so fair, so grand.
Long may it sway o’er Bight and Bay,
Around the shores of Newfoundland!

What’er betide, our Ocean Bride
That nestles ‘midst Atlantic’s foam
Still far and wide, we’ll raise with pride
Our native flag, o’er hearth and home.

Should e’er the hand of fate demand
Some future change in our career:
We ne’er will yield: on flood or field
The flag we honour and revere!

Fling out the flag, o’er creek and cragg;
Pink, white and green, so fair, so grand.
Long may it sway, o’er Bight and Bay,
Around the shores of Newfoundland!

Archbishop Michael F. Howley of St. John’s, The Flag of Newfoundland, 1902.

God Guard Thee, Newfoundland

The Newfoundland Tricolour. The "Pink, White and Green" flag first appeared in the 1880s or 1890s and was based on the colours of the Catholic fraternal group the Star of the Sea Association, which was formed in St. John's in 1871. The official colour of the Star of the Sea Association, rose (a liturgical colour and one rare in vexillology), replacing the orange panel of the Protestant William of Orange.
The Newfoundland Tricolour. The unofficial “Pink, White and Green” flag first appeared in the 1880s or 1890s and was based on the colours of the Catholic fraternal group the Star of the Sea Association, which was formed at St. John’s in 1871. Nearly identical to the Irish Tricolour, the official colour of the Star of the Sea Association, rose (a liturgical colour and one rare in vexillology), replaces the orange panel of the Protestant William of Orange.

When sun rays crown thy pine clad hills,
And summer spreads her hand,
When silvern voices tune thy rills,
We love thee, smiling land.
We love thee, we love thee,
We love thee, smiling land.

When spreads thy cloak of shimmering white,
At winter’s stern command,
Thro’ shortened day, and starlit night,
We love thee, frozen land.
We love thee, we love thee
We love thee, frozen land.

When blinding storm gusts fret thy shore,
And wild waves lash thy strand,
Thro’ spindrift swirl, and tempest roar,
We love thee windswept land.
We love thee, we love thee
We love thee windswept land.

As loved our fathers, so we love,
Where once they stood, we stand;
Their prayer we raise to Heaven above,
God guard thee, Newfoundland
God guard thee, God guard thee,
God guard thee, Newfoundland.

Ode to Newfoundland,
composed by Governor Sir Cavendish Boyle in 1902.