A Plaintive Harvest

THE CLEARANCE SONG. From Lochourn to Glenfinnan the gray mountains ranging, Naught falls on the eye but the changed and the changing; From the hut by the lochside, the farm by the river, Macdonalds and Cameron pass—and for ever. The flocks of one stranger the long glens are roaming, Where a hundred bien homesteads smoked bonny at […]

Seals of the Burghs of Argyll

CAMPBELTOWN is built on what was originally the seat of the Dalriadan monarchy. About the middle of the third century Cormac, King of Ireland, quelled a dispute which had arisen between two tribes, and during this civil war Cormac’s cousin, Cairbre-Riada, conquered a district in the north-east of Ireland, which he called Dalriada, or the […]

The Witch of Keil

This old lady is introduced to us by Mr. F. A. Mackay, in his poem of “The Heir of Lorn.” Moila was her name, and she lived at the beginning of the thirteenth century, though she was popularly supposed to have seen Fingal in his prime, and her wrinkled and tremendously aged face seemed, literally, […]

Last of the MacDonalds of Islay

“FOR it shall be known, I shall seek no other refuge but only your Majesty’s clemency, nor no other living, but that which your Majesty’s princely liberality, it shall please your Highness bestow upon me as at more length, the bearer will inform your Majesty, and so I beseech God to bless your Highness with […]

Song of the Highland Clans

Oran Nam Fineachan Gaidhealach. Alasdair mac Mhaighstir Alasdair A chomuinn rìoghail rùnaich Sàr-ùmhlachd thugaibh uaibh, Biodh ur roisg gun smùirnein, ‘S gach cridh’ gun treas gin lùib ann; Deoch-slàinte Sheumais Stiùbhairt Gu mùirneach cuir mu’n cuairt! Ach ma ta giamh air bith ‘nur stamaig, A’ chailis naomh na truaill. Lìon deoch-slàinte Theàrlaich, A mheirlich! stràic […]

The Pipes Always Attended

HIGHLAND FUNERALS. THE gathering for the funeral of a chief in the old time, comprehended not only the whole clan and its branches, but all its “kin and allies;” and since the Highlanders, like the present Albanians and Rajah-Poots, always carried their weapons, it is scarce necessary to observe that the muster was ”in arms.” […]

Dean Monro on Jura

Duray. Nairest that iyle layes Duray, ane ather fyne forrest for deire, inhabit and manurit at the coist syde, part be Clandonald of Kyntyre, pairt be Mac Gullayne of Douard, pairt be M’ Gellayne of Kinlochbuy, pairt be M’ Duffithie of Colvansay, ane iyle of twenty-four myle of length, lyand from the southwest to the […]

The Maid of Lochnell

There is an old tradition that one of the Campbells of Lochnell had a daughter who fell in love with a young chieftain of the clan MacDonald, whose love she had in return. At the time, there was feud between the two clans, and her father forbade her to countenance him in any way. One day […]

Colla Ciotach and Dunstaffnage

After the defeat and murder of Sir Alexander MacDonald’s (Colla Ciotach’s son) followers at Dunaverty (Dunàbhartaidh) in Kintyre, General Leslie and the Earl of Argyll crossed over to Islay (Ile) and besieged Dun-naomhaig, held by Colla Ciotach. After a short resistance, Colla consented to surrender on certain conditions, to which Leslie agreed. While the terms of […]

Patrimonial Possessions of the Ancients

Seventeen hundred years exactly, And fifteen years directly close, From the birth of God to the death of Allan, Whoever should enquire. Our importuning of the Chief over heaven, Grant, O Mary, O Son, our request. That he be in heaven of the angelic orders, If it be the will of our Lord. To the […]

That Vice Runs Much in a Bloud

Reasons against the Restoration of Argyll Confiscated  Property.1 Some reasons why Archibald Campbell, sometime Lord Lorn, ought not to be restored to the honour or estate of his late father, Archibald, sometime Marquess of Argyle (“Argyll”):— BECAUSE it hath been alwaies held very dangerous, both for the interest of the Prince and peace of the people, […]

Colquhoun’s Leap

Some time before the Massacre of Glencoe, the laird of Appin (Tighearna na H-Apunn) had a servant of the name of Colquhoun, in whom he placed great confidence. On a certain occasion he sent him to Inverness (Inbhirnis) for money. The road from Appin to Inverness passed through Glencoe, but Colquhoun was afraid to take […]