Whom They Have Pierced Through

Et effundam super domum David et super habitatores Jerusalem spiritum gratiæ et precum: et aspicient ad me quem confixerunt, et plangent eum planctu quasi super unigenitum, et dolebunt super eum, ut doleri solet in morte primogeniti.

In die illa, magnus erit planctus in Jerusalem, sicut planctus Adadremmon in campo Mageddon.

Et dicetur ei: Quid sunt plagæ istæ in medio manuum tuarum? Et dicet: His plagatus sum in domo eorum qui diligebant me.

Framea, suscitare super pastorem meum, et super virum cohærentem mihi, dicit Dominus exercituum: percute pastorem, et dispergentur oves: et convertam manum meam ad parvulos. Zecharias. xii. 10, 11. xiii. 6, 7.

Firmly, Resolutely, from the Depth of Our Being

Elevation of the Host, Midnight Mass of Christmas, 2012, Shrine of Christ the King, Chicago, Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest.
Elevation of the Host, Midnight Mass of Christmas, 2012, Shrine of Christ the King, Chicago, Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest.

The Eucharist is the central dogma of our religion. It is called the generating dogma of Catholic piety. It is not the papacy, as you seem to think.

The Papacy is nothing other than the word-bearer of Christ.  Thanks to the Papacy, the faithful keep the dogma and morality taught by Jesus Christ intact. It is this protection that keeps us on the right road, precisely marked out by our Divine Founder. But it is only Christ that remains, the Way, the Truth and the Life.

Now, Christ is not a Being who disappeared someplace we do not know of, nor even the far away Being that we think of.  He is alive. He lives among us. He is present in the Eucharist. And this is why the Eucharist is the base, the centre, the heart of religion. From whence comes every life. Not from anywhere else.

You do not believe it. But we believe it. We believe firmly, resolutely, from the depth of our being, that in the tabernacle of each of our churches, God truly resides under the appearance of the Host.

Dom Jean Baptiste Chautard, Abbot of Sept-Fons to Georges Benjamin Clemenceau, Prime Minister of France, in a dialogue related in the former’s Les cisterciens Trappistes, l’âme cistercienne.

(h/t to Rorate Cæli.)