Adze-head

Ticfa táilcend tar muir meircenn: a bratt tollcend, a chrand cromchend: a mías inairthiur a tigi: fris[g]erat a múinter huili, ‘Amen, amen.’ Ticfat tailcind, conutsat ruama, noifit cella, ceoltigi béndacha ben[n]chopuir ili: fla[i]th himbachla. Two years or three years before Patrick’s arrival, this is what they used to prophesy:– Adzehead1 will come over a furious […]

Christ Was Victor in the North

Of the manner in which St. Columba overcame Broichan the Druid and sailed against the wind. On a certain day after the events recorded in the foregoing chapters, Broichan, whilst conversing with the saint, said to him: “Tell me, Columba, when dost thou propose to set sail?” The saint replied, “I intend to begin my […]

To Confound the Druids

By virtue of his prayer, and in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, he healed several persons suffering under various diseases; and he alone, by the assistance of God, expelled from this our island, which now has the primacy, innumerable hosts of malignant spirits, whom he saw with his bodily eyes assailing himself, and […]

Except Ye Taste of Death

It appears that King Laoghaire had two daughters, named Ethne the fair, and Fedelm the ruddy. He had sent them, for what reason is not explained, to his relatives in Connaught, and placed them under the care of two Druids or magi, named Mael and Caplit. Patrick was at Crochan, or Cruachan, the royal cemetery […]

Eructavit Cor Meum Verbum Bonum

The sound of the Voice of Columbkille Great its sweetness above all clerics: To the end of fifteen hundred paces, Though great the distance, it was distinctly heard. — From the Irish Life of St. Columba in the Leabhar Breac. I must not pass over another well-authenticated story, told, indeed, by those who heard it, regarding […]

With All the Display Which the Parties Could Make

The Highlanders had no feasts nor rejoicings at a birth, but a funeral was conducted with all the display which the parties could make. All the clan, and numerous neighbors, were invited and entertained with a profusion of every thing. The male part of the procession was regularly arranged according to rank, and, instead of […]

They Differ in This from Almost All Other Nations

All the Gauls assert that they are descended from the god Dis, and say that this tradition has been handed down by the Druids. For that reason they compute the divisions of every season, not by the number of days, but of nights; they keep birthdays and the beginnings of months and years in such an order that the […]

Alii Immani Magnitudine Simulacra Habent

Natio est omnis Gallorum admodum dedita religionibus, atque ob eam causam, qui sunt adfecti gravioribus morbis quique in proeliis periculisque versantur, aut pro victimis homines immolant aut se immolaturos vovent administrisque ad ea sacrificia druidibus utuntur, quod, pro vita hominis nisi hominis vita reddatur, non posse deorum immortalium numen placari arbitrantur, publiceque eiusdem generis habent […]

Cæsar on the Druids

Chapter XIII Throughout all Gaul there are two orders of those men who are of any rank and dignity: for the commonality is held almost in the condition of slaves, and dares to undertake nothing of itself, and is admitted to no deliberation. The greater part, when they are pressed either by debt, or the large amount of their […]

Daemones ab Eodem Recesserunt Fonte

Caput 10: De Alia Maligna Fontana Aqua Quam Vir Beatus in Pictorum Regione Benedixit ALIO in tempore, vir beatus, cum in Pictorum provincia per aliquot demoraretur dies, audiens in plebe gentili de alio fonte divulgari famam, quem quasi deum stolidi homines, diabolo eorum obcaecante sensus, venerabantur; nam de eodem fonticulo bibentes, aut in eo manus […]