Some Traveller from New Zealand

There is not, and there never was on this earth, a work of human policy so well deserving of examination as the Roman Catholic Church. The history of that Church joins together the two great ages of human civilisation. No other institution is left standing which carries the mind back to the times when the […]

Even to the Twentieth Generation

That is the mark of the Scot that he stands in an attitude to the past unthinkable in Englishmen, and remembers and cherishes the memory of his forebears, good and bad, and there burns alive in him a sense of identity with the dead, even to the twentieth generation. — Robert Louis Stevenson.

Rubha na Carraig-gèire

In this Iland is marble enough, whereof the late Earle of Argyle caused polish a piece at London abundantly beautifull. In a particular place of the Island, neer the sea ebbing and flowing thereinto, there are found transparant stones of all colours, but most ordinarily green, much resembling agatts: they yield to the file and […]

It Is History That Teaches Us to Hope

My experience of men has neither disposed me to think worse of them, or indisposed me to serve them; nor in spite of failures, which I lament, of errors which I now see and acknowledge; or of the present aspect of affairs; do I despair of the future. The truth is this: The march of […]

The Irish According to Fynes Moryson (I)

What follows is a very unflattering, but historically instructive, description of the Irish people  in the Tudor age by Fynes Moryson, an English world traveller who published his observations on divers countries across Europe.  I will be posting various snippets, which whilst being severely tainted by English hatred, are still interesting in the Irish Gaelic […]