Pivot of Justice and Kingdom of Peace

Cod. Bruchsal 1, Bl. 1v, Evangelistar von Speyer, c. 1220, Badische Landesbibliothek, Karlsruhe, Germany.
Cod. Bruchsal 1, Bl. 1v, Evangelistar von Speyer, c. 1220, Badische Landesbibliothek, Karlsruhe, Germany.

But peace is the ‘tranquillity of order, divine, national, social, and individual, which ensures to everyone his place and gives him what is due to him, putting the glory of God above all duties and making the brotherly service of all derive from His love.’ And such is the human condition and the order of Divine Providence — without its having been possible hitherto to find a substitute for it — that war, though it is one of the most terrible scourges of mankind, yet sometimes it is the heroic and only remedy for replacing things on the centre of the pivot of justice and bringing them back to the Kingdom of Peace. Therefore the Church, even while she is the daughter of the Prince of Peace, blesses the emblems of war, has founded the military Orders, and has organized the Crusades against the enemies of the Faith.

Joint Letter of the Spanish Bishops to the Bishops of the Whole World Concerning the War in Spain, July 1st, 1937.

St. Luke Portrait from the Lichfield Gospels

Portrait of St. Luke (perhaps also representing High King of Ireland, Flaithbertach mac Loingsig, r. 728-734 (723-729), † 765), Lichfield Gospels, p. 218.
Portrait of St. Luke (perhaps also representing High King of Ireland, Flaithbertach mac Loingsig, r. 728-734 (723-729), † 765), Lichfield Gospels, p. 218.

I Will Make A Great People of Thee

The Bosom of Abraham from Hortus deliciarum, Herrad of Landsberg, Abbess of Hohenburg, ca. 1180.
The Bosom of Abraham from Hortus deliciarum, Herrad of Landsberg, Abbess of Hohenburg, ca. 1180.

Benedicam benedicentibus tibi, et maledicam maledicentibus tibi, atque in te benedicentur universæ cognationes terræ.

Gen. xii. 3.

The Three Marys of Great Reknown

The Three Marys at the Tomb (1396) by Lorenzo Monaco; illumination on vellum; 46 x 48 cm, Musée du Louvre, Paris.
The Three Marys at the Tomb (1396) by Lorenzo Monaco; illumination on vellum; 46 x 48 cm, Musée du Louvre, Paris.

Respóndens autem Angelus, dixit muliéribus: Nolíte timére: scio enim quod Iesum quǽritis, allelúia. Antiphon from Vespers during the Octave of Easter

And when the sabbath was over, Mary Magdalen, and Mary the mother of James, and Salome had bought spices, to come and anoint Jesus. So they came to the tomb very early on the day after the sabbath, at sunrise. And they began to question among themselves, Who is to roll the stone away for us from the door of the tomb? Then they looked up, and saw that the stone, great as it was, had been rolled away already. And they went into the tomb, and saw there, on the right, a young man seated, wearing a white robe; and they were dismayed. But he said to them, No need to be dismayed; you have come to look for Jesus of Nazareth, who was crucified; he has risen again, he is not here. Here is the place where they laid him. Go and tell Peter and the rest of his disciples that he is going before you into Galilee. There you shall have sight of him, as he promised you.

— St. Mark xvi. 1-7.

A Pheadair, a Aspail,
An bhfaca tú mo ghrá geal?
Óchón agus óchón-ó!
Chonaic mé ar ball é,
Gá chéasadh ag an ngarda.
Óchón agus óchón-ó!
Peter, Apostle,
Have you seen my bright love?
Alas, and alas-o!
I saw not long ago
Surrounded by his enemies.
Alas, and alas-o!
Cé hé an fear breá sin
Ar Chrann na Páise?
Óchón agus óchón-ó!
An é n-aithníonn tú do Mhac,
A Mháthrín?
Óchón agus óchón-ó!
Who is that good man
Upon the Passion Tree?
Alas, and alas-o!
It is your son, Mother,
Don’t you recognise me?
Alas, and alas-o!
An é sin an Maicín
A hoileadh in ucht Mháire?
Óchón agus óchón-ó!
An é sin an Maicín
A rugadh insan stábla?
Óchón agus óchón-ó!
Is that the wee son
That was nourished at Mary’s breast?
Alas, and alas-o!
Is that the son
That was born to me in the stable?
Alas, and alas-o!
An é sin an Maicín
A d’iompair mé trí ráithe?
Óchón agus óchón-ó!
A Mhicín mhúirneach,
Tá do bhéal ‘s do shróinín gearrtha,
Óchón agus óchón-ó!
Is that the son
I carried for three quarters?
Alas, and alas-o!
Darling little son,
Your mouth and your nose are cut,
Alas, and alas-o!
Cuireadh tairní maola
trína chosa ‘s trína lámha,
Óchón agus óchón-ó!
Cuireadh an tsleá
Trína bhrollach álainn.
Óchón agus óchón-ó!
Óchón agus óchón-ó!
Blunt nails were pushed through
His feet and his hands.
Alas, and alas-o!
And a spear pierced
Through his beautiful chest.
Alas, and alas-o!
Alas, and alas-o!

— Caoineadh na dTrí Muire (Lament of the Three Marys)

Stowe Missal: Folio 1 Recto

Folio 1 recto (incipit of the Gospel of St. John) from the Stowe Missal (MS D II 3, Royal Irish Academy, Dublin).
Folio 1 recto (incipit of the Gospel of St. John) from the Stowe Missal (MS D II 3, Royal Irish Academy, Dublin).

Corpus-Cotton Gospels: Folio 1 Recto

Folio 1 recto from Corpus Christi College, MS 197B (Otho-Corpus Gospels); the Eagle of St. John. The Otho-Corpus Gospels is a badly damaged and fragmentary 8th century illuminated manuscript. It was part of the Cotton library and was mostly burnt in the 1731 fire at Ashburnham House. The manuscript now survives as charred fragments in the British Library (MS Cotton Otho C V). Thirty six pages of the manuscript were not in the Cotton collection and survived the fire. They are now in the library of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge (MS 197B).

Folio 285 Recto

Folio 285 recto from the Book of Kells; “Una autem sabbati valde…”
[Now upon the first day of the week…] (St. Luke 24:1).