Siege of Enniskillen Castle

Your sheriff shall be welcome but let me know his eric, that if my people should cut his head off I may levy it upon the country. Hugh Maguire, Lord of Fermanagh. Enniskillen. ¶1] Alas for him who looks on Enniskillen, with its glistening bays and melodious falls; it is perilous for us, since one […]

MacFadyen’s Cave

MACFADYEN came from Ireland (Eirin) to Cantyre (Cinn-tìre), with a following of 1400 men, to assist King Edward in his efforts to conquer Scotland. From Cantyre he made his way to Lorne (Lathurna), where he was joined by a party of the MacDougalls. When the Knight of Lochow (Loch-odha) heard of his coming, he sent a […]

I Do Not Compare the Disciple with the Master

Baithen was a man of tender soul, of whom we would fain speak at greater length, if it were not needful to circumscribe the wide and confused records of Celtic hagiography. Columba compared him to St John the Evangelist; he said that his beloved disciple resembled him who was the beloved disciple of Christ, by his exquisite […]

Souvenir of St. Columba’s Stone

[Long Tower Church was the first Catholic church constructed in Derry after the Protestant Reformation. The bullaun (Irish: bullán) stone known as St. Columba’s Stone was enshrined here on 9 June 1898, having been moved from its original location by St. Columba’s Well (Tobar Colm Cille) the previous year.] St. Columba’s Stone. No matter what […]

Towards Alba of the Ravens

This is a poem of Columkille’s, or at least ascribed to him. It is in very irregular metre, or rather changes its metre several times. The literal translation of the first few verses is as follows:– Delightful to be on Ben Edar (the Hill of Howth) before going over the sea, white, white; the dashing […]

“St. Quhalme”

The three names [SS. Patrick, Brigid, and Columba] have remained since that time inseparably united in the dauntless heart and fervent tenacious memory of the Irish people. It is to Columba that the oppressed and impoverished Irish seem to have appealed with the greatest confidence in the first English conquest in the twelfth century. The […]

By the Vengeance of Columb-cille

Hugo de Lacy, the profaner and destroyer of many churches; Lord of the English of Meath, Breifny, and Oriel; he to whom the tribute of Connaught was paid; he who had conquered the greater part of Ireland for the English, and of whose English castles all Meath, from the Shannon to the sea, was full; […]

Patrimonial Possessions of the Ancients

Seventeen hundred years exactly, And fifteen years directly close, From the birth of God to the death of Allan, Whoever should enquire. Our importuning of the Chief over heaven, Grant, O Mary, O Son, our request. That he be in heaven of the angelic orders, If it be the will of our Lord. To the […]