“Scotland of Old”

Cover of Bartholomew's Map of Scotland of Old, John Bartholomew & Son, Edinburgh, c. 1956.
Cover of Bartholomew’s Map of Scotland of Old, John Bartholomew & Son, Edinburgh, c. 1956.
Bartholomew's Map of Scotland of Old, John Bartholomew & Son, Edinburgh, c. 1956; clan map by Sir Iain Moncreiffe, Albany Herald, and Don Pottinger, Unicorn Pursuivant of Arms.
Bartholomew’s Map of Scotland of Old, John Bartholomew & Son, Edinburgh, c. 1956; clan map by Sir Iain Moncreiffe, Albany Herald, and Don Pottinger, Unicorn Pursuivant of Arms.

Teamhair na Rí

Nineteenth century plan of the Hill of Tara, based on a site survey and historical records; Wakeman's Handbook of Irish Antiquities (1903).
Nineteenth century plan of the Hill of Tara, based on a site survey and historical records; Wakeman’s Handbook of Irish Antiquities (1903).

A Compleat Description of the Province of Carolina

A compleat description of the province of Carolina in 3 parts : 1st, the improved part from the surveys of Maurice Mathews & Mr. John Love : 2ly, the west part by Capt. Tho. Nairn : 3ly, a chart of the coast from Virginia to Cape Florida.
A compleat description of the province of Carolina in 3 parts : 1st, the improved part from the surveys of Maurice Mathews & Mr. John Love : 2ly, the west part by Capt. Tho. Nairn : 3ly, a chart of the coast from Virginia to Cape Florida; Edward Crisp, c. 1711; Library of Congress Geography and Map Division, 2004626926.

A Mapp of Virginia Discovered to ye Hills

"A mapp of Virginia discovered to ye hills, and in it's latt. from 35 deg. & 1/2 neer Florida to 41 deg. bounds of New England"; originally published in 1651 by John Farrer, a representative of the Virginia Company, this 1667 edition was issued by Farrer's daughter, Virginia. It perpetuates the notion that the Pacific Ocean lay just across the Allegheny Mountains -- separated by a narrow strip of land that could be traversed in but a "ten days marche." The cartographic propaganda linked Sir Francis Drake's 1577 landing in New Albion (Point Reyes, California) with the recently settled Virginia colony, thereby substantiating English claims to the breadth of the North American continent.
“A mapp of Virginia discovered to ye hills, and in it’s latt. from 35 deg. & 1/2 neer Florida to 41 deg. bounds of New England”; originally published in 1651 by John Farrer, a representative of the Virginia Company, this 1667 edition was issued by Farrer’s daughter, Virginia. It perpetuates the notion that the Pacific Ocean lay just across the Allegheny Mountains — separated by a narrow strip of land that could be traversed in but a “ten days marche.” The cartographic propaganda linked Sir Francis Drake’s 1577 landing at New Albion (Point Reyes, California) with the recently settled Colony of Virginia, thereby substantiating English claims to the breadth of the North American continent.

Mappa Thaneti Insule

Map of the Isle of Thanet in the early 15th century, based on a map in Thomas Elmham's Historia Monasterii S Augustini Cantuariensis; The History and Antiquities Ecclesiastical and Civil of the Isle of Tenet in Kent, 1773.
Map of the Isle of Thanet in the early 15th century, based on a map in Thomas Elmham’s Historia Monasterii S Augustini Cantuariensis; The History and Antiquities Ecclesiastical and Civil of the Isle of Tenet in Kent, 1773.

Freedom, Fraternity, Federation

Imperial Federation, Map of the World Showing the Extent of the British Empire in 1886.
Imperial Federation, Map of the World Showing the Extent of the British Empire in 1886.

At the Least One Godly and Learned Minister

And to the end that the People, both present and to come, may be faithfully brought up in the true knowledge and service of Almighty God, and so learne to frame their lives and conversations, as not onely, not to provoke the Devine indignation, which pursueth the faithless and disobedient soules by sundry kinds of punishment to everlasting destruction: but also by their good example, to allure the Heathen people to submit themselves to the Scepter of Gods most righteous and blessed Kingdome, and so finally to joyne with them in the true Christian profession: We doe hereby ordaine and require, that in every Burrough there be provided and placed at the least one godly and learned Minister, to be chosen in each Particular Plantation by the several Adventurers and Planters; And for the foure ancient Burroughs, to be provided and nominated by us, and our Successors; As also for the Tenants and Inhabitants of the Companies Land wheresoever: Leaving alwaies to the Governour to provide a Minister for his Tenants, and to the Colledge for theirs. All which Ministers and Their Successors, we earnestly pray and require to try themselves with all diligence, to the training up of their charge in the way of righteousness, as the same is now professed, and by Law established in this Church of England, and other his Majesties Dominions, avoiding all factions, and needlesse Novelties, tending onely to the disturbance of peace and unity. And whereas we have ordained heretofore, that one hundred acres of Glebe land be set out and allotted for every Minister, besides other profits out of the Inhabitants encrease: We doe hereby also ordaine, that the said Ministers be furnished, each with sixe Tenants, towards the occupying of his Glebe land; which sixe, for the Ministers belonging to the Publike lands; that is to say, the Governours, Colledges, and Companies Land, shall bee sent and furnished wholly at the common charges of the Company. And for the Burroughs, as well the ancient, as those of Particular Plantations, the Company is content to furnish out at their charges, three Tenants for each, upon condition that the severall Burroughs furnish out three more: which sixe, for each Minister being once so furnished, the Ministers themselves shall be afterwards charged each to maintain that number at the least, and so to leave them to his Successor.

— “Broadside,” or the printed and published letter of instructions sent by the Virginia Company of London to the Governor of the Virginia Colony and his Council of State,
17 May 1620.

Gallia Est Omnis Divisa in Partes Tres

Gaul on the eve of the Gallic Wars. Roman ethnography divides Gaul into five parts, Gallia Cisalpina, Gallia Narbonensis, Gallia Aquitania, Gallia Celtica (largely corresponding to the later province Gallia Lugdunensis) and Gallia Belgica.

The first day of second year Latin class:

Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres, quarum unam incolunt Belgae, aliam Aquitani, tertiam qui ipsorum lingua Celtae, nostra Galli appellantur. Hi omnes lingua, institutis, legibus inter se differunt. Gallos ab Aquitanis Garumna flumen, a Belgis Matrona et Sequana dividit. Horum omnium fortissimi sunt Belgae, propterea quod a cultu atque humanitate provinciae longissime absunt, minimeque ad eos mercatores saepe commeant atque ea quae ad effeminandos animos pertinent important, proximique sunt Germanis, qui trans Rhenum incolunt, quibuscum continenter bellum gerunt. Qua de causa Helvetii quoque reliquos Gallos virtute praecedunt, quod fere cotidianis proeliis cum Germanis contendunt, cum aut suis finibus eos prohibent aut ipsi in eorum finibus bellum gerunt. Eorum una, pars, quam Gallos obtinere dictum est, initium capit a flumine Rhodano, continetur Garumna flumine, Oceano, finibus Belgarum, attingit etiam ab Sequanis et Helvetiis flumen Rhenum, vergit ad septentriones. Belgae ab extremis Galliae finibus oriuntur, pertinent ad inferiorem partem fluminis Rheni, spectant in septentrionem et orientem solem. Aquitania a Garumna flumine ad Pyrenaeos montes et eam partem Oceani quae est ad Hispaniam pertinet; spectat inter occasum solis et septentriones.

— Gaius Julius Cæsar, De Bello Gallico, Book I, Chapter 1.

An t-Eilean Sgitheanach

The Isle of Skye as shown on Willem Blaeu’s 1654 Atlas of Scotland.

“This Ile is callit Ellan Skiannach in Irish, that is to say in Inglish the wyngit Ile, be reason it has mony wyngis and pointis lyand furth fra it, throw the dividing of thir foirsaid Lochis.”

— Description of the Western Isles of Scotland called Hybrides, by Mr. Donald Munro, High Dean of the Isles, who travelled through most of them in the year 1549.

* * *

Here is the link to the large version of this map.