The Hills Keep Watch

Niall Diarmid Campbell, 10th Duke of Argyll, c. 1920; An Iodhlann, Tiree.

[W]hen an estate is so heavily burdened by an accumulation of debts inherited by its present possessor from the unwisdom of their forefathers. A point is ever reached … when the interest on money borrowed can no longer be paid and the lands themselves have to be sold. This in brief is what had happened not only with the lands we speak to you of, but of nearly all the lands which march with Ardkinglass. You will all of you recollect that it was but some 10 years ago that the neighbouring estate of Strachur which (with that of Ardgarten) was held for at least 9 centuries by a branch of our race passed into other hands. Drimsynie, Carrick, Ardentinny and Kilmun and even Dunoon all once part of the vast Barony of Ardkinglass and all held by younger sons of the parent stock have long since passed away, with the single exception of Dunoon which is still held by one of the old race. And though it seem but a span in the lifetime of a planet, and though the hills that keep watch, in their own unchanging silence, over the changing ownership of the glens, shall smile at the thought it seems a long time in the history of the race when we look back at the far off day when Cailein Oig first Laird of Ardkinglass with his three tall sons settled, in the place where in obedience to a predicted omen his hamper strings should snap.

Letter of Niall Diarmid Campbell, 10th Duke of Argyll, to the tenantry of Ardkinglas upon deciding to sell the estate (h/t Ardkinglas Estate).

Argyll Mausoleum

The Argyll Mausoleum.

Rebuilt in 1795-1796, the Argyll Mausoleum, standing in the church-yard of Kilmun Parish Church on its north-east side, is the burying-place of the Chiefs of the Clan Campbell.  Twenty generations of chiefs, living over the last five hundred years, are buried here, the most recent being the Tenth Duke of Argyll, Niall Diarmid.  The deteriorating structure contains mediæval burial effigies dating to the 1450s, which are thought to be the last remaining examples of such fine quality in Scotland.

Effigies of Sir Duncan Campbell of Loch Awe, and his wife Marjorie, the great great grand-daughter of Robert the Bruce.

St. Munn’s Parish Church is a Category A listed building occupying the summit of a slight knoll about eleven yards from the shoreline of the Holy Loch.  The present building of 1841 is on the site of a mediæval parish church, endowed as a collegiate church in 1442 by Sir Duncan Campbell of Lochawe, and a tower of that period stands to the west of the existing church.

The great iron dome was forged in the Glasgow shipyards and erected during a restoration of the Mausoleum in the 1890s.
Kilmun Parish Church and Cemetery.