Gu Bràth, Am Byth

Bruti posteritas cum Scotis associata
Anglica regna premet, Marte, labore, nece.
Flumina manabunt hostili tincta cruore
Perfida gens omni lite subacta ruet,
Quem Britonum fundet Albanis juncta juventus:
Sanguine Saxonico tincta rubebit humus:
Regnabunt Britones Scotorum gentis amici
Antiquum nomen insula tota feret;
Ut profert aquila veteri de turre locuta,
Cum Scotis Britones regna paterna regent.
Regnabunt pariter in prosperitate quieta
Hostibus expulsis, judicis usque diem.

John of Fordun, Chronica Gentis Scotorum, lib. III., cap. xxii., quoting a poem of Gildas.

[The posterity of Brutus in league with the Scots shall harrass England with war, toil, and death; the rivers shall flow discoloured with blood, and the perfidious nation shall sink subdued by every contest. The British and Albanian youth united shall overwhelm them, and the soil be crimsoned with Saxon blood. The Britons shall reign in friendship with the Scots; the whole island shall bear its ancient name, as the eagle which spoke from the old tower declares; the Britons and Scots shall rule over the kingdoms of their ancestors, and reign alike in profound peace, after the expulsion of their enemies, until the day of judgment.]

Even to the Twentieth Generation

That is the mark of the Scot that he stands in an attitude to the past unthinkable in Englishmen, and remembers and cherishes the memory of his forebears, good and bad, and there burns alive in him a sense of identity with the dead, even to the twentieth generation.

— Robert Louis Stevenson.

Dunadd

Dunadd, (Scottish Gaelic Dún Add, 'fort on the [River] Add'), is an Iron Age and later hillfort near Kilmartin in Argyll and Bute, Scotland and believed to be the capital of the ancient kingdom of Dál Riata.
Dunadd, (Scottish Gaelic Dún Add, ‘fort on the [River] Add’), is an Iron Age and later hillfort near Kilmartin in Argyll and Bute, Scotland and believed to be the capital of the ancient kingdom of Dál Riata.
Dunadd is mentioned twice in early sources. In 683 the Annals of Ulster record: 'The siege of Dún At and the siege of Dún Duirn' without further comment on the outcome or participants. In the same chronicle the entry for 736 states: 'Aengus son of Fergus, king of the Picts, laid waste the territory of Dál Riata and seized Dún At and burned Creic and bound in chains two sons of Selbach, i.e. Donngal and Feradach.'
Dunadd is mentioned twice in early sources. In 683 the Annals of Ulster record: ‘The siege of Dún At and the siege of Dún Duirn’ without further comment on the outcome or participants. In the same chronicle the entry for 736 states: ‘Aengus son of Fergus, king of the Picts, laid waste the territory of Dál Riata and seized Dún At and burned Creic and bound in chains two sons of Selbach, i.e. Donngal and Feradach.’

Originally occupied in the Iron Age, the site later became a seat of the kings of Dál Riata. It is known for its stone carvings below the upper enclosure, including the imprint of a foot and a basin thought to have formed part of Dál Riata’s coronation ritual. On the same flat outcrop of rock is an incised boar in Pictish style, and an inscription in the ogham script. The inscription is read as referring to a Finn Manach and is dated to the late VIII century or afterwards.

The renowned incised stone footprint on Dunadd.
The renowned incised stone footprint on Dunadd.
The ceremonial basin at Dunadd. Along with the footprint, some historians have suggested that the two might have played a role in the coronation summary of the Scots kings of Dál Riata.
The ceremonial basin at Dunadd. Along with the stone footprint, some historians have suggested that the two might have played a role in the coronation ceremony of the Scots kings of Dál Riata.

An t-Eilean Sgitheanach

The Isle of Skye as shown on Willem Blaeu’s 1654 Atlas of Scotland.

“This Ile is callit Ellan Skiannach in Irish, that is to say in Inglish the wyngit Ile, be reason it has mony wyngis and pointis lyand furth fra it, throw the dividing of thir foirsaid Lochis.”

— Description of the Western Isles of Scotland called Hybrides, by Mr. Donald Munro, High Dean of the Isles, who travelled through most of them in the year 1549.

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Here is the link to the large version of this map.

Puir Bluidy Swaddies Are Wearie

152 Light Aid Detachment attached to 152 Brigade of 51st Highland Division, Sicily, 1943.

The pipie is dozie, the pipie is fey
He wullnae come roun for his vino the day
The sky owre Messina is unco an gray
An aa the bricht chaumers are eerie

Fareweill ye banks o Sicily
Fare ye weill ye valley an shaw
There’s nae Jock will murn the kyles o ye
Aa the bricht chaumers are eerie
[Puir bliddy swaddies are wearie]
Fareweill ye banks o Sicily
Fare ye weill ye valley an shaw
There’s nae hame can smour the wiles o ye
Aa the bricht chaumers are eerie
[Puir bliddy swaddies are wearie]

Then doun the stair an line the watterside
Wait yer turn the ferry’s awa
Then doun the stair an line the watterside
Aa the bricht chaumers are eerie

The drummie is polisht, the drummie is braw
He cannae be seen for his wabbin ava
He’s beezed himsell up for a photie an aa
Tae leave wi his Lola, his dearie

Fareweill ye banks o Sicily
Fare ye weill ye sheilin an haa
We’ll aa mind shebeens an bothies
Whaur kind signorinas were cheerie
Fareweill ye banks o Sicily
Fare ye weill ye sheilin an haa
We’ll aa mind shebeens an bothies
Whaur Jock made a date wi his dearie

Then tune the pipes an drub the tenor drum
Leave yer kit this side o the waa
Then tune the pipes an drub the tenor drum
Puir bluidy swaddies are wearie
[Aa the bricht chaumers are eerie]

— 51st (Highland) Division’s Farewell To Sicily (as sung by Dick Gaughan); Written by Hamish Henderson (original lyrics in brackets) to the tune “Farewell To The Creeks“; composed by Pipe-Major James Robertson.

There’s a Youth in This City

There’s a youth in this city, it were a great pity
That he from the lasses should wander awa’;
For he’s bonie an braw, weel-favor’d with a’,
An’ his hair has a natural buckle an’ a’.

His coat is the hue o’ his bonnet sae blue,
His fecket is white as the new-driven snaw,
His hose they are blae, and his shoon like the slae,
And his clear siller buckles, they dazzle us a’.

For beauty and fortune the laddie’s been courtin;
Weel-featur’d, weel-tocher’d, weel-mounted, an’ braw,
But chiefly the siller that gars him gang till her –
The penny’s the jewel that beautifies a’!

There’s Meg wi’ the mailen, that fain wad a haen him.
And Susie, wha’s daddie was laird of the Ha’,
There’s lang-tocher’d Nancy maist fetters his fancy;
But the laddie’s dear sel he loes dearest of a’.

— Robert Burns.

Chronicon Scotorum, Annal CS432

Kal. vi. A.D. 432

From the death of the hero, Cucullainn, to this year, there are 431 years; from the death of Conchobhar Mac Nessa, 412 years.

Patrick, i.e. the Archbishop, comes to Hibernia, and begins to baptize the Scoti, in the ninth year of Theodosius the younger, the first year of the episcopate of Sixtus, 45th Bishop of the Roman Church, and the fourth year of the reign of Laeghaire, son of Niall.

— Chronicon Scotorum, Annal CS432.

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It is interesting to note when the Irish/Scottish annals date the stories and personages of the Ulster Cycle.  It is as if the glorious mythological era in pagan Ireland came to an harmonious end with the Incarnation of Our Lord, His Lifetime, and the dawning of the New Religion.