A Regular and General Musical Education

Sheet Music: Dixie’s Land, c. 1859, by Daniel Decatur Emmett, Virginia Historical Society, Mss2 Em 645 a1.
Sheet Music: Dixie’s Land, c. 1859, by Daniel Decatur Emmett, Virginia Historical Society, Mss2 Em 645 a1.

No one can tell us, we verily believe, why vocal music ought not to be a branch of common school education in Virginia, just as much as in Prussia. A resolution that it should be so, entered into this day, by those who have power to carry their resolutions into execution, would be a greater blessing to the State, we verily believe, than either of the railroads which have been chartered, or have received legislative donation this winter. It would be a direct contribution to the children of the land, of a large mass of solid enjoyment, of an innocent character, and worth more to them than an ingot to each, massy as they could bear home, of Californian gold. But we know our country too well to hope that such is going to be case very soon. It will probably be long, before that very obvious idea, very obvious when distinctly looked at, that music is a branch of common education, and one of the most valuable branches, will be admitted into the craniums of the old-world people, — health and long life to their honours! — who yet linger among us, and who are averse to one-half the means and instrumentalities of a genuine civilization, either as sinful things, or as new and proud inventions. In default of a regular and general musical education, such as ought to be given to both sexes, let us try diligently the best practical means — singing schools — if the teacher be not a stray Yankee — singing societies, singing classes of all descriptions. There are no happier re-unions of young people than such.

Southern Literary Messenger, Volume XIX, no. 2, April 1853 (Richmond, Virginia).

A Toast to the Alabama

Sheet Music Cover; The Alabama.
Sheet Music Cover; The Alabama.

The wind blows off yon rocky shore,
Boys! set your sails all free;
And soon our booming cannon’s roar
Shall ring out merrily.
Run up your bunting taught a-peak,
And swear, lads, to defend her;
‘Gainst every foe, where ‘er we go,
Our motto “No Surrender!”

Chorus:

Then sling the bowl, drink ev’ry soul,
A toast to the Alabama;
What e’er our lot, through storm or shot,
Here’s success to the Alabama!

Our country calls all hands to arms,
We hear but to obey;
Nor shall home’s most endearing charms
Steal one weak thought away,
Our saucy craft shall roam the deep,
We’ve sworn, lads, to defend her;
Trim, taught and tight, we’ll brave the fight,
Our motto “No Surrender!”

Chorus

Our home is on the mountain wave,
Our flag floats proudly free;
No boasting despot, tyrant, knave,
Shall crush fair Liberty.
Firmly we’ll aid her glorious cause,
We’ll die, boys, to defend her;
We’ll brave the foe, where’er we go,
Our motto “No Surrender!”

Chorus

Boys! if perchance it may befall,
When storm of battle raves,
By shot or shell our noble hull
Shall sink beneath the waves,
Yet while a plank to us is left
To death we will defend her;
Facing the foe, down, down we’ll go,
But still cry “No Surrender!”

Chorus.

A Nautical Song. The Alabama. Respectfully dedicated to the gallant Captain Semmes, his officers and crew, and to the officers and seamen of the C. S. Navy;
E. King, author of the Naval Songs of the South.

An Emblem of Freedom Unfurled in the Right

Sheet Music Cover; The Star Spangled Cross and the Pure Field of White.
Sheet Music Cover; The Star Spangled Cross and the Pure Field of White.

The Star-Spangled Cross and the pure field of white
Is the banner we give to the breeze,
‘Tis an emblem of Freedom unfurled in the right,
O’er our homes and our lands and our seas.

CHORUS:

We’ll stand by the Cross
And the pure field of white,
While a shred’s left to float on the air:
Our trust is in God, who can help us in fight,
And defend those who ask Him in prayer.

For years we have cringed to the uplifted rod,
For years have demanded our right,
Our voice shouts defiance, our trust is in God,
And the strong arm that gives us our might.

CHORUS

Our hills and our vales with the death shriek may ring,
And our forests may swarm with the foe,
But still to the breeze our proud banner we’ll fling,
And to Vict’ry or Death we will go.

CHORUS

— The Star Spangled Cross and the Pure Field of White;
written and composed by “Subaltern.”

The Song of the South

Sheet music cover for “The Song of the South” composed by James H. Huber. Note the labels under the two flags: The flag as it is (the original seven star design of the First National Confederate Flag); and, the flag as it will be (with the addition of many more states from the Old Union).

The National Hymn

Cover of sheet music for “God Save the South” featuring the Second National Confederate Flag.

Thirteen Southern Stars

Confederate sheet music cover, “13 Southern Stars.”

Stars and Bars

Sheet music cover for “The Confederate Flag,” lyrics by Mrs. C. D. Elder and music by Sig G. George.

For Southern Rights Hurrah!

Cover of sheet music for “The Bonnie Blue Flag” by Harry Macarthy.

God Save the South

Sheet music cover for the unofficial Confederate national anthem ‘God Save the South’.
“God Save the South” is considered to be an unofficial national anthem of the Confederate States of America. It was written by George Henry Miles (as Ernest Halphin). The commonly-heard version was composed by Charles W. A. Ellerbrock, while C. T. De Cœniél composed a different tune for the song. It was written in 1861.

* * *

I.
God save the South, God save the South,
Her altars and firesides, God save the South!
Now that the war is nigh, now that we arm to die,
Chanting our battle cry, “Freedom or death!”
II.
God be our shield, at home or afield,
Stretch Thine arm over us, strengthen and save.
What tho’ they’re three to one, forward each sire and son,
Strike till the war is won, strike to the grave!
Strike till the war is won, strike to the grave!
III.
God made the right stronger than might,
Millions would trample us down in their pride.
Lay Thou their legions low, roll back the ruthless foe,
Let the proud spoiler know God’s on our side.
Let the proud spoiler know God’s on our side.
IV.
Hark honor’s call, summoning all.
Summoning all of us unto the strife.
Sons of the South, awake! Strike till the brand shall break,
Strike for dear Honor’s sake, Freedom and Life!
Strike for dear Honor’s sake, Freedom and Life!
V.
Rebels before, our fathers of yore.
Rebel’s the righteous name Washington bore.
Why, then, be ours the same, the name that he snatched from shame,
Making it first in fame, foremost in war.
Making it first in fame, foremost in war.
VI.
War to the hilt, theirs be the guilt,
Who fetter the free man to ransom the slave.
Up then, and undismay’d, sheathe not the battle blade,
Till the last foe is laid low in the grave!
Till the last foe is laid low in the grave!
VII.
God save the South, God save the South,
Dry the dim eyes that now follow our path.
Still let the light feet rove safe through the orange grove,
Still keep the land we love safe from Thy wrath.
Still keep the land we love safe from Thy wrath.
VIII.
God save the South, God save the South,
Her altars and firesides, God save the South!
For the great war is nigh, and we will win or die,
Chanting our battle cry, “Freedom or death!”
Chanting our battle cry, “Freedom or death!”

God Save the Southern Land

Sheet Music Cover; God Save the Southern Land; Cameron, S. F. composer; 1 score ([4] p.) : col. ill. ; 30 cm.; 1864; Confederate Imprints Collection, William Stanley Hoole Special Collections Library, University of Alabama.

In Memory of the Confederate Dead

In Memory of the Confederate Dead; sheet music cover; composed by Jules C. Meininger; published at Louisville by McCarrell and Meininger.

The Star Spangled Cross and the Pure Field of White

The Star Spangled Cross and the Pure Field of White. Second Pattern Confederate National Flag.