Old Virginia, Once Again

Memorial to the City's fallen in the Great War, Monument Terrace, Lynchburg, Virginia.
Memorial to the City’s fallen in the Great War, Monument Terrace, Lynchburg, Virginia.

Once again the call is coming, and the fiery cross on high
Blazes as before Manassas when our fathers went to die;
Trains of soldiery are moving, rumbling seaward once again,
Rolling as in early sixties, to the songs of eager men,
Puffing onward through the valley from the mountains to the bay,
Bearing on the lads in khaki of the sires who wore the gray.

From the portals of Mount Vernon and the heights of Arlington,
Down the line to Appomattox by the shrine of Jefferson,
From the Shenandoah’s highlands and the Roanoke’s flowered vales,
From the townships of the Piedmont and the Rappahannock dales,
They are coming to the colors for the God Almighty fray,
Future heroes of the khaki born of heroes of the gray.

From tobacco fields and orchards, from the studies and the games,
From the Allegheny cabins and the mansions on the James,
Out of factories and offices and furnaces and mills,
From the cities and the hamlets’ shaded lanes and sunny hills,
They are coming for the Union, theirs forever and a day,
These the eaglets of the eagles of the glory-misted gray.

Down the Blue Ridge they are going on to somewhere on the seas,
Through the mountains that were Jackson’s and the valleys that were Lee’s,
By the mounds upon the hilltops and their monuments that tell
How the wearied ragged legions nobly fought and nobly fell.
O, they’re going on high-hearted to an unforgotten day
When the boys who wear the khaki will be worthy of the gray.

What a history behind them, what a future just ahead!
What an inspiration given by the mothers’ living dead!
What a heritage of glory in the deeds of high romance!
What a legacy to carry to the battle fields of France!
O Virginia, old Virginia, let your shadows point the way
To immortal paths of honor for the children of the gray!

— Littell M’Clung, Old Virginia, Once Again, Confederate Veteran, Vol. XXVI, no. 6, June 1918.

This is Your Flag

Recruitment poster for the 207th (Ottawa-Carleton) Battalion, CEF.
Recruitment poster for the 207th (Ottawa-Carleton) Battalion, CEF.

This is your flag — Fight for it.

This slogan of the 207th has
been made the title of a
stirring song dedicated to
the 207th Battalion — Read it —

Words by Miss Esther Knott.
Music by Donald Heins.

How would you care to see the old flag down, boys,
Would you care to see her dragged in the mire?

Could you bear to hear it said
That you crawled beneath the bed,
While the rest of us were standing up to fire?

Would you care to hear the Kaiser was in England;
That his fleet was on the way to Old Quebec?

Would you care to have the girls
With the pretty golden curls,
See you get a German bayonet in the neck?

Chorus:

Come on the (sic) boys, this is your flag,
And it surely means to you
That the world expects to see your tag
And believes that you’ll be true.
Come on, boys, this is your flag,
Show the red blood — and the blue —
For the men are white —
Who join the fight —
And surely you’ll be true.

Don the MacLean Tartan

Recruitment poster for the 236th Battalion (New Brunswick Kilties), Canadian Expeditionary Force.
Recruitment poster for the 236th Battalion (New Brunswick Kilties), Canadian Expeditionary Force.

The Black Watch, August 1918

The Black Watch, August 1918; distribution of packs after action at Rheims, France.
The Black Watch, August 1918; distribution of packs after action at Rheims, France.

Kilt Apron

Black Watch Officers c. 1914/15; The Black Watch Museum; Bob Marrion Collection.
Black Watch officers c. 1914/15; The Black Watch Museum; Bob Marrion Collection. Notice the protective kilt aprons, with pockets to replace the sporran.

They Hivna Forgotten Us

IMG_5826

48th Highlanders

Recruitment poster for 48th Highlanders (Canada): 1200 men wanted at once for the 134th Highlanders Overseas Battalion; First World War.
Camp flag of the 48th Highlanders of Canada.
Regimental Colours of the 48th Highlanders of Canada.

Pipers of the Black Watch

Pipers of the Black Watch upon their return from the capture of Longueval, France, during the First World War.

Pay Begins at Once

Recruitment Poster; 91st Highlanders; Canadian Expeditionary Force; World War I.

During the First World War, the Regiment acted as a training unit providing 145 officers and 5,207 other ranks for service in the numbered battalions of the C.E.F., especially the 16th, 19th, and the 173rd Highlanders. The latter was broken up for reinforcements, much to the chagrin of its men. Although the Argylls perpetuate both the 19th and the 173rd, it is the former which provides the Regiment its most intimate connection with the Great War. The 91st gave the 19th all four of its commanding officers and its Pipe Major, Charles Davidson Dunbar, DCM, a Pipe Major of international renown.

As part of the 4th Infantry Brigade, 2nd Division, the 19th went from the mud and misery of Salisbury Plain, England, to the mud and blood of Flanders. The Battalion saw its first action at Saint-Eloi in April 1916 and went on to serve on the Somme, at Courcelette, Vimy Ridge, Hill 70, Passchendaele, Drocourt-Quéant, and the Pursuit to Mons. In December 1918, its pipe Band played a victorious Canadian Corps across the Rhine and into Germany. The 19th has had no official history published.

8th Service Battalion, Black Watch

8th Service Battalion, Black Watch; 26th Brigade, 9th (Scottish) Division; Bordon Camp, Aldershot 1915.

Perhaps it was conventional not to wear the sporran in group shots like this?

Cuidich ‘n Righ

Seaforth Highlanders, 4th Company, 4th Battalion, 1914-1919.

A curious pose without the sporran…

Black Watch Celebration

The Black Watch celebrating the New Year during the Great War.