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Francis.

Et accesserunt ad eum pharisæi et sadducæi tentantes: et rogaverunt eum ut signum de cælo ostenderet eis. At ille respondens, ait illis: Facto vespere dicitis: Serenum erit, rubicundum est enim cælum. Et mane: Hodie tempestas, rutilat enim triste cælum. Faciem ergo cæli dijudicare nostis: signa autem temporum non potestis scire? Generatio mala et adultera signum quærit: et signum non dabitur ei, nisi signum Jonæ prophetæ. Et relictis illis, abiit.

Matt. xvi. 1-4.

RESCRIPTUM «EX AUDIENTIA SS.MI»

Summus Pontifex decernit ut duo Documenta quae praecedunt edantur per publicationem in situ electronico Vaticano et in Actis Apostolicae Sedis, velut Magisterium authenticum.

Ex Aedibus Vaticanis, die V mensis Iunii anno MMXVII
Petrus Card. Parolin
Secretarius Status

All the Psalms Sung in Thy Kirks

The 1828 R & R Dickson spire atop the Tron Kirk, Edinburgh.
The 1828 R & R Dickson spire atop the Tron Kirk, Edinburgh.

Then began he to upbraid the cities wherein most of his mighty works were done, because they repented not: And thou, Capernaum, which art exalted unto heaven, shalt be brought down to hell: for if the mighty works, which have been done in thee, had been done in Sodom, it would have remained until this day.

St. Matthew xi. 20, 23.

If a’ the blood shed at thy Tron
Edinbro’, Edinbro’
If a’ the blood shed at thy Tron
Were shed intae a river
It would ca’ the mills of Bonnington
Edinbro’, Edinbro’
It would ca’ the mills of Bonnington
For ever and for ever.

If a’ the tears that thou hast grat
Edinbro’, Edinbro’
If a’ the tears that thou hast grat
Were shed intae the sea
Where would ye find an Ararat
Edinbro’, Edinbro’
Where would ye find an Ararat
Frae that fell flood tae flee?

If all the psalms sung in thy kirks
Edinbro’, Edinbro’
If all the psalms sung in thy kirks
Were gaithered in the wynd
It would shaw the tops o’ Roslin’s birks
Edinbro’, Edinbro’
It would shaw the tops o’ Roslin’s birks
Till time was oot o’ mind.

If a’ the broken hearts o’ thee
Edinbro’, Edinbro’
If a’ the broken hearts o’ thee
Were heaped in a howe
There would be neither land nor sea
Edinbro’, Edinbro’
There would be neither land nor sea
But yon rede brae and thou.

— Lewis Spence, Capernaum

Such is Truly Demoniac, Blind, and Dumb

Saint Augustine in His Study by Sandro Botticelli, 1480, Chiesa di Ognissanti, Florence, Italy.
Saint Augustine in His Study by Sandro Botticelli, 1480, Chiesa di Ognissanti, Florence, Italy.

Dæmonium enim habens, cæcus et mutus est, qui non credit Deo; et subditus est diabolo, qui non intelligit, et non confitetur ipsam fidem, vel qui non dat laudem Deo. S. Augustinus, Quæst. Ev., i, 4.

To Whom Should We Go?

Statue of the saint in St. Peter's Square.
Statue of the saint in St. Peter’s Square.

With demoralising “off-the-cuff” interviews emanating from Rome now seemingly every other week, it is good to be reminded… portæ inferi non prævalebunt adversus eam (St. Matt. xvi. 18.).

After this, many of his disciples went back to their old ways, and walked no more in his company. Whereupon Jesus said to the twelve, Would you, too, go away? Simon Peter answered him, Lord, to whom should we go? Thy words are the words of eternal life; we have learned to believe, and are assured that thou art the Christ, the Son of God.

St. John vi. 67-70.

Book of Deer: Folio 5 Recto

Folio 5 recto from the Book of Deer; the text of the Gospel of St. Matthew from 1:18 through 1:21. Note the Chi Rho monogram in the upper left corner. The margins contain Gaelic text.

The Book of Deer (Leabhar Dhèir in Gaelic) (Cambridge University Library, MS. Ii.6.32) is a 10th-century Latin Gospel Book with early 12th-century additions in Latin, Old Irish and Scottish Gaelic. It is noted for containing the earliest surviving Gaelic writing from Scotland.

The origin of the book is uncertain, however it is reasonable to assume that the manuscript was at Deer, Aberdeenshire, Scotland when the marginalia were written. It may be the oldest surviving manuscript produced in Scotland, and is notable for having possibly originated in what is now considered a Lowland area. The manuscript belongs to a category of what are known today as Irish pocket Gospel Books, which were produced for private rather than for liturgical use. While the manuscripts to which the Book of Deer is closest in character are all Irish, most scholars argue for a Scottish origin. The book has 86 folios and measures 54 mm by 107 mm. It is written on vellum in brown ink and is in a modern binding.

Lindisfarne Gospels: Folio 29 Recto

Folio 29 recto from the Lindisfarne Gospels; St Matthew’s Gospel includes a second major initial page, marking the beginning of the Christmas story. The first three lines contain the words: Christi autem generatio sic erat — Now the birth of Jesus Christ was on this wise.

XVII Sunday after Pentecost

The Collect

Grant, we beseech Thee, O Lord, that Thy people may shun all the wiles of the devil: and with pure mind follow Thee, the only God. Through our Lord.

The Epistle. Ephes. iv. 1.

I therefore, the prisoner of the Lord, beseech you that ye walk worthy of the vocation wherewith ye are called, with all lowliness and meekness, with longsuffering, forbearing one another in love; endeavouring to keep the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace. There is one body, and one Spirit, even as ye are called in one hope of your calling; One Lord, one faith, one baptism, One God and Father of all, who is above all, and through all, and in you all.

The Gospel. St. Matt. xxii. 34.

When the Pharisees had heard that Jesus had put the Sadducees to silence, they were gathered together. Then one of them, which was a lawyer, asked him a question. tempting him, and saying, Master, which is the great commandment in the law? Jesus said unto him, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets. While the Pharisees were gathered together, Jesus asked them, saying, What think ye of Christ? whose son is he? They say unto him, The son of David. He saith unto them, How then doth David in spirit call him Lord, saying, The Lord said unto my Lord, Sit thou on my right hand, till I make thine enemies thy footstool? If David then call him Lord, how is he his Son? And no man was able to answer him a word, neither durst any man from that day forth ask him any more questions.