Argyll Pipe Banner

Torquhil Ian Campbell, 13th and 6th Duke of Argyll and Chief of Clan Campbell, together with the Duchess of Argyll, presents a new pipe banner to Senior Pipe-Major Martin MacDonald, on behalf of the Royal Regiment of Scotland.
Torquhil Ian Campbell, 13th and 6th Duke of Argyll and Chief of Clan Campbell, together with the Duchess of Argyll, presents a new pipe banner to Senior Pipe-Major Martin MacDonald, on behalf of the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

The Duke and Duchess of Argyll presented a pipe banner to the Royal Regiment of Scotland during the Inveraray Highland Games at Inveraray Castle. The Senior Pipe-Major for the British Army, Martin MacDonald, received the banner on behalf of the Regiment.

The pipe banner is embroidered with the badge of the Royal Regiment of Scotland on one side and the Duke of Argyll’s coat of arms on the other, symbolising his support for Scottish soldiers and in particular for Balaklava Company, 5th Battalion the Royal Regiment of Scotland (The Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders) who have a historic link to Argyll.

Soldiers from Balaklava Company marched through Inveraray to the Games and were joined at the event by soldiers from The Highlanders, 4th Battalion the Royal Regiment of Scotland and 51st Highland, 7th Battalion the Royal Regiment of Scotland (one of two Army Reserve Battalions in the Regiment) some of whom took part in the athletic events.

His Grace The Duke of Argyll said:

As a Campbell and an Argyll, it is a great privilege for my wife and I to be able to present this pipe banner to Balaklava Company, The Royal Regiment of Scotland, and of course to carry on what is a very long association with the Regiment.

Captain Chris Hesketh, who was leading the Balaklava Company contingent at the Games, said: “As Scottish infantry soldiers we draw strength from the community around us and we will be proud to parade this symbol of support from The Duke and Duchess of Argyll. Balaklava Company is very proud of our heritage and we have relished the support we have enjoyed here at Inveraray, marching through the town and taking part in today’s Highland Games.”

(British Army press release.)

Foundation of the Monastery of Deer

Folio 3 of the Book of Deer (Leabhar Dhèir) contains a continuation of the Gospel According to St. Matthew and a Scottish Gaelic account of the foundation of the Monastery of Deer by SS. Columba and Drostan.

Colum Cille & Drostán mac Cosgreg a dalta tángator a hÍ mar ro falseg Dia doib gonic’ Abbordoboir, & Bede cruthnec robo mormær Buchan ar a ginn; & ess é ro thidnaig doib in gathraig-sain in saere go bráith ó mormaer & ó thosec. Tángator as a athle-sen in cathraig ele, & do-raten ri Colum Cille sí, iar fa llán do rath Dé. Acus do-rodloeg ar in mormær .i. Bede go-ndas tabrad dó, & ní tharat. Acus ro gab mac dó galar, iar n-ére na glérec, & robo marb act mad bec. Iar sen do-chuid in mormaer d’attac na glérec go ndéndaes ernacde lesin mac go ndísad slánte dó; & do-rat i n-edbairt doib ua Cloic in Tiprat gonice Chloic Pette Mec-Garnait. Do-rónsat i n-ernacde, & tánic slá dó. Iar sen do-rat Collum Cille do Drostán in chadraig-sen, & ro-s benact, & fo-rácaib in mbréther, ge bé tísad ris, ná bad blienec buadacc. Tángator déara Drostán ar scarthain fri Collum Cille. Ro laboir Colum Cille, ‘Bed Déar a anim ó shunn imacc.’

Columba and Drostán son of Coscrach, his disciple, came from Iona, as God guided them, to Aberdour; and Bede the Pict was mormaer of Buchan on their arrival; and it is he who bestowed on them that monastery, in freedom till Doomsday from mormaer and toísech. They came after that to the other monastery, and it pleased Columba, for it was full of the grace of God. And he begged the mormaer, that is, Bede, that he should give it to them, and he did not. And a son of his took a sickness, after the clerics had been refused, and was all but dead. Thereupon the mormaer went to beseech the clerics that they should make a prayer on behalf of the boy, that health might come to him; and he gave to them land as a grant from Cloch in Tiprat as far as Cloch Peitte Meic-Garnait. They made the prayer, and health came to him. Thereupon Columba gave Drostán that monastery, and blessed it, and left the curse that whoever should go against it should not be full of years or of success. Drostán’s tears [déra] came as he was parting from Columba. Columba said, ‘Let Deer be its name from this on.’

Book of Deer.

Modern Hy

Map of Iona engraved by John Bartholomew, from William Reeve's Life of Saint Columba, Edinburgh (1874).
Map of Iona engraved by John Bartholomew, from William Reeve’s Life of Saint Columba, Edinburgh (1874).

Harrowing Inroads

“Viking Raider Stone” from Lindisfarne, thought to depict the Northmen who attacked the monastery in A.D. 793.
“Viking Raider Stone” from Lindisfarne.

Her wæron reðe forebecna cumene ofer Norðhymbra land, ⁊ þæt folc earmlic bregdon, þæt wæron ormete þodenas ⁊ ligrescas,⁊ fyrenne dracan wæron gesewene on þam lifte fleogende. Þam tacnum sona fyligde mycel hunger, ⁊ litel æfter þam, þæs ilcan geares on .vi. Idus Ianuarii, earmlice hæþenra manna hergunc adilegode Godes cyrican in Lindisfarnaee þurh hreaflac ⁊ mansliht.

This year came dreadful fore-warnings over the land of the Northumbrians, terrifying the people most woefully: these were immense sheets of light rushing through the air, and whirlwinds, and fiery dragons flying across the firmament. These tremendous tokens were soon followed by a great famine: and not long after, on the sixth day before the Ides of January in the same year, the harrowing inroads of heathen men made lamentable havoc in the church of God in Holy-island, by rapine and slaughter.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, A.D. 793.

Derrynaflan Paten

This composite silver paten, was discovered on 17 February 1980, near Killenaule, County Tipperary, as part of the Derrynaflan Hoard, a collection of five liturgical vessels, including a silver chalice and bronze strainer, dating from the VIII to IX centuries. The paten was assembled from more than 300 pieces. The dish is made of beaten silver which is soldered and stitched with wire to a bronze rim. Twelve curved gilt-bronze frames on the rim each contain two gold filigree panels and a central decorative stud. These frames are attached to each other by bronze rivets, the heads of which are concealed under twelve glass and enamel studs. Some of the filigree panels have abstract patterns, and human and animal motifs are also seen. A number of panels depict pairs of kneeling men placed back to back. Derrynaflan, the site of an early Irish abbey, is a small island of dry land situated in a surrounding area of peat bogs, in the townland of Lurgoe, Co. Tipperary, northeast of Cashel.

St. Ninian’s Isle Treasure

The St. Ninian’s Isle Treasure, dating from approximately A.D. 800, is the finest surviving collection of Scottish silver from the period. The hoard was discovered in July 1958, in the ruins of a twelfth century chapel on St. Ninian’s isle, a land-tied island connected to the southwestern coast of the Mainland, Shetland.  The metalwork hoard (mainly silver, some gilt) consists of both secular pieces — penannular brooches and sword scabbard chapes, for example — and ritual objects such a bowls and spoons. The brooches show a variety of typical Pictish forms, with both zoomorphic and lobed geometric terminals, and two of the scabbard chapes and a sword pommel appear to be of Anglo-Saxon origin, probably made in Mercia in the late 8th century; one has an inscription with a prayer in Old English.

Castle Tioram