The Harrowing Inroads of Heathen Men

Her wæron reðe forebecna cumene ofer Norðhymbra land, ⁊ þæt folc earmlic bregdon, þæt wæron ormete þodenas ⁊ ligrescas,⁊ fyrenne dracan wæron gesewene on þam lifte fleogende. Þam tacnum sona fyligde mycel hunger, ⁊ litel æfter þam, þæs ilcan geares on .vi. Idus Ianuarii, earmlice hæþenra manna hergunc adilegode Godes cyrican in Lindisfarnaee þurh hreaflac ⁊ mansliht.

This year came dreadful fore-warnings over the land of the Northumbrians, terrifying the people most woefully: these were immense sheets of light rushing through the air, and whirlwinds, and fiery dragons flying across the firmament. These tremendous tokens were soon followed by a great famine: and not long after, on the sixth day before the Ides of January in the same year, the harrowing inroads of heathen men made lamentable havoc in the church of God in Holy-island, by rapine and slaughter. Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, A.D. 793.

The Glory of Brightness

Image of the Enthroned Virgin and Child from a 12th century copy of St. Augustine's commentary on the last fifty psalms. It was produced at the Benedictine Abbey of Eynsham and displays Anglo-Saxon stylistic elements rare in a manuscript of this date. MS. Bodl. 269 fol. iii recto.

Image of the Enthroned Virgin and Child from a 12th century copy of St. Augustine’s commentary on the last fifty psalms. It was produced at the Benedictine Abbey of Eynsham and displays Anglo-Saxon stylistic elements rare in a manuscript of this date. MS. Bodl. 269 fol. iii recto.

Quam si diligentius aspicias, nihil virtutis est, nihil speciositatis, nihil candoris gloriae, quod ex ea non resplendeat.1 Der Pseudo-Hieronymus-Brief IX “Cogitas me”, ed. Ripberger, §92.

Nis heo nanes haliges mægnes bedæled, ne nanes wlites, ne nanre beorhtnysse; and forðy heo wæs ymbtrymed mid rosen and lilian, þæt hyre mihta wæron mid mihtum underwriðode, and hire fægernys mid clænnysse wlite wære geyht.2 The Homilies of the Anglo-Saxon Church, Vol. I.

1If you consider most diligently, there is nothing of excellence, nothing of beauty, nothing of the glory of brightness, which does not shine brightly from her.

2She is void of no holy virtue, nor any beauty, nor any brightness; and therefore was she encircled with roses and lilies, that her virtues might be supported by virtues, and her fairness increased by the beauty of chastity.

Blameless Woman and Hallowed Man

Tree of Life and Death, painted by Berthold Furtmeyr and found in the third volume of a five-volume missal (circa 1481) commissioned by Bernhard von Rohr, Archbishop of Salzburg.

Tree of Life and Death, painted by Berthold Furtmeyr and found in the third volume of a five-volume missal (circa 1481) commissioned by Bernhard von Rohr, Archbishop of Salzburg.

Benedicta, inquit, tu inter mulieres, quae uitam et uiris et mulieribus peperisti. Ede, inculpabilis femina, inuiolabilem uirum; et sic et feminam saluabis et uirum. Mater generis nostri poenam intulit mundo; genetrix Domini nostri salutem et feminae gessit viro… Pseudo-Augustine, Sermo cxx, PL 39, 1985.

MacMillan’s Cross at Kilmory

MacMillan's Cross, Plate XXXIII, Sculptured Stones of Scotland, Vol. 2, 1856.

MacMillan’s Cross, Plate XXXIII, Sculptured Stones of Scotland, Vol. 2, 1856.

 

Detail of inscription on the rear face of MacMillan's Cross.

Detail of inscription on the rear face of MacMillan’s Cross.

The chapel of Kilmorie, in South Knapdale, has been already referred to as having traditionally been erected by St. Charmaig (Cormac). Its walls are still almost complete, and it is surrounded by a burying-ground. In both the chapel and graveyard are many slabs ornamented with the sword and shears. The cross figured in this Plate is in the churchyard. On one side is represented the crucifixion of our Lord, with figures which may be meant for the Blessed Virgin and St. John. Beneath is a two-handed sword. On the other side of the shaft is a stag-hunt, the dogs being represented with collars, as on some of the early east cross slabs, and lower down is an armed man holding in his hand a battle-axe, with a large horn suspended from his shoulder. Beneath his feet is the inscription — HEC EST CRVX ALEXANDRI MACMVLEN. The Macmillans, according to their traditions, were connected with the clan Chattan, and a branch of them possessed the greater part of Southern Knapdale, where their chief was known under the title of Macmillan of Knap; but although they were at a very early period in Knapdale, they probably obtained the greater part of their possessions there by marriage with the heiress of the chief of the Macneils in the sixteenth century. To an early part of this century the cross is probably to be ascribed. A drawing and notice of this monument occurs in Archæologia Scotica, vol. iv. p. 377.

– Sculptured Stones of Scotland, Vol. 2, 1856.

An Incalculable Error

Alfred Cardinal Ottaviani in October, 1958.

Alfred Cardinal Ottaviani in October, 1958.

Today, division and schism are officially acknowledged to exist not only outside of but within the Church. Her unity is not only threatened but already tragically compromised. Errors against the Faith are not so much insinuated but rather an inevitable consequence of liturgical abuses and aberrations which have been given equal recognition.

To abandon a liturgical tradition which for four centuries was both the sign and the pledge of unity of worship (and to replace it with another which cannot but be a sign of division by virtue of the countless liberties implicitly authorized, and which teems with insinuations or manifest errors against the integrity of the Catholic religion) is, we feel in conscience bound to proclaim, an incalculable error. Short Critical Study on the New Order of Mass.

Empress of Hell

Icon of the enthroned Virgin and Child with SS. George, Theodore and angels, 6th century, Saint Catherine's Monastery.

Icon of the enthroned Virgin and Child with SS. George, Theodore and angels, 6th century, Saint Catherine’s Monastery.

Aue Marie mater Domini nostri Iesus Christi regina celi domina mundi imperatrix inferni misere mei & totius populi Christiani Amen. / Dia do betha a Muiri a mathair ar Tigerna .i. Isa Crist a righan nimi a bantigerna in domuin a banimpir ifirn / dena trocuiri orum agus ar in pobul ar c[h]ena. Antiphon from the Saltair Mhuire, attributed to Domhnall Albannach Ó Troighthigh, in manuscript dated 1477.

Eject Vice and Follow Treuth Alway

Portrait of James I, King of Scots, National Galleries of Scotland.

Portrait of James I, King of Scots, National Galleries of Scotland.

Sen throw vertew incressis dignitie,
And vertew is flour and rute of noblesse ay,
Of ony wit or quhat estait thow be,
His steppis follow and dreid for none effray:
Eject vice and follow treuth alway:
Lufe maist thy God that first thy lufe began,
And for ilk inche he will the quyte ane span.

Be not ouir proude in thy prosperitie,
For as it cummis sa will it pas away;
The tyme to compt is schort thow may weill se,
For of grene gress sone cummis wallowit hay.
Labour in treuth quhilk suith is of thy fay;
Traist maist in God, for he best gyde the can,
And for ilk inche he will the quyte ane span.

Sen word is thrall and thocht is only fre,
Thou dant thy toung, that power hes and may,
Thou steik thy ene fra warldis vanitie:
Refraine thy lust, and harkin quhat I say:
Graip or thow slyde, and keip furth the hie-way,
Thow hald the fast upon thy God and man,
And for ilk inche he will the quyte ane span.

– James I, King of Scots, from The Gude and Godlie Ballates (1578).

Their Own Imaginations

Origen, illustration from Les vrais pourtraits et vies des hommes illustres grecz, latins et payens (1584) by André Thevet.

Origen, illustration from Les vrais pourtraits et vies des hommes illustres grecz, latins et payens (1584) by André Thevet.

And I may tell you from my experience, that not many take from Egypt only the useful, and go away and use it for the service of God; while Ader the Idumæan has many brethren. These are they who, from their Greek studies, produce heretical notions, and set them up, like the golden calf, in Bethel, which signifies God’s house. In these words also there seems to me an indication that they have set up their own imaginations in the Scriptures, where the word of God dwells, which is called in a figure Bethel. The other figure, the word says, was set up in Dan. Now the borders of Dan are the most extreme, and nearest the borders of the Gentiles, as is clear from what is written in Joshua, the son of Nun. Now some of the devices of these brethren of Ader, as we call them, are also very near the borders of the Gentiles. Letter of Origen to St. Gregory Thaumaturgus.

This is Your Flag

Recruitment poster for the 207th (Ottawa-Carleton) Battalion, CEF.

Recruitment poster for the 207th (Ottawa-Carleton) Battalion, CEF.

This is your flag — Fight for it.

This slogan of the 207th has
been made the title of a
stirring song dedicated to
the 207th Battalion — Read it –

Words by Miss Esther Knott.
Music by Donald Heins.

How would you care to see the old flag down, boys,
Would you care to see her dragged in the mire?

Could you bear to hear it said
That you crawled beneath the bed,
While the rest of us were standing up to fire?

Would you care to hear the Kaiser was in England;
That his fleet was on the way to Old Quebec?

Would you care to have the girls
With the pretty golden curls,
See you get a German bayonet in the neck?

Chorus:

Come on the (sic) boys, this is your flag,
And it surely means to you
That the world expects to see your tag
And believes that you’ll be true.
Come on, boys, this is your flag,
Show the red blood — and the blue —
For the men are white —
Who join the fight —
And surely you’ll be true.

Dunnicaer Sea Stack

Class I Pictish symbol stone from Stonehaven, Aberdeenshire, bearing a double disc and Z-rod, recovered from the Dunnicaer (Dun-Na-Caer) sea stack in the 19th century, and now embedded with three others in a modern stone wall at Banchory House.

Class I Pictish symbol stone from Stonehaven, Aberdeenshire, bearing a double disc and Z-rod, recovered from the Dunnicaer (Dun-Na-Caer) sea stack in the 19th century, and now embedded with three others in a modern stone wall at Banchory House.

The siege of Dún Foither. Annals of Ulster, U681/U694.

From the BBC:

Archaeologists have uncovered a “very significant” Pictish fort after scaling a remote sea stack off the coast of Aberdeenshire.

The team from the University of Aberdeen believe the ancient remains could be one of many along the coast south of Stonehaven.

It is the first time an official excavation has been carried out there.

Pictish symbol stones were said to be found on the Dunnicaer sea stack by locals in the 19th Century.

Until this latest discovery, it was unclear whether the site held other historical remains.

The Aberdeen team believe they have found the remains of a house, a fireplace and ramparts.

[…]

Lead archaeologist Dr Gordon Noble said it could be the precursor to Dunnotter Castle, the remains of which lie a quarter of a mile south of the site.

He explained: “We’ve opened a few trenches so far. This is the site where, in the 19th Century, they found six Pictish stones when a group of youths from Stonehaven came up the sea stack.

“Here we’ve got clear evidence of people living on the sea stack at least for part of the year. Certainly people are living here for long enough to create this really nice well-constructed hearth and these lovely floor layers.”